Deviled Eggs with Shrimp

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Most of the time, I leave sacred holiday food alone. I mean, why mess around with something you know is good? My family loves deviled eggs and they are mostly purists–nothing fancy, nothing crazy. But this year, I tempted fate by offering a variation on our usual deviled eggs featuring fresh, locally caught shrimp. We purchased the shrimp from Locals Seafood, a terrific, local company that brings us fresh, North Carolina seafood several times a week. The result was very tasty and beautiful!

A note about the shrimp shells. Use the opportunity to make some homemade seafood stock! Get double benefit from poaching the shrimp by reserving the poaching liquid, adding back in enough water to make a quart of liquid (or so–you don’t have to be exact). Add the shrimp shells, two stalks of celery , peppercorns and 1/2 onion. Simmer for 45 minutes, strain and let cool. Freeze for up to 6 months.

Deviled Eggs with Shrimp (makes 12 egg halves)

  • 12 medium raw shrimp, shells on
  • 1/2 lemon, cut into 4 pieces
  • 2 sprigs fresh dill
  • 6 farm fresh eggs
  • 1/2 cup real mayonnaise
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  1. Put the shrimp, one sprig of dill and the lemon in a saucepan and cover with water. Heat shrimp over medium high until shrimp is pink and opaque. Do not overcook.
  2. Drain shrimp, let cool and remove the shells (save the shells for making seafood stock!).
  3. Leave shrimp in the refrigerator until you are ready for them.
  4. Put the eggs in the saucepan and cover with water. Bring water to a boil, then cover, turn off the heat and let the pot sit for 15 minutes.
  5. Drain the eggs and run under cold water to stop the cooking process. Leave the eggs in the refrigerator for 15 minutes or so.
  6. Peel the eggs. Cut each egg in half lengthwise and pop the yolks into a medium mixing bowl. Move the empty whites to a serving platter.
  7. Mash the yolks with a fork. Mix with mayonnaise, salt and pepper until smooth. Add more mayonnaise if needed. Scoop the egg yolk mixture into the egg white shells or use a piping bag, if you want to be fancy.
  8. Just prior to serving, top each deviled egg with one poached shrimp and a small piece of dill.

Week 43 Budget and Menu

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Our weather has been perfect for mushrooms! The markets are full of fresh Shitake mushrooms this week!

October! October is here!!! It’s still in 80’s here in North Carolina, so we’re not exactly feelin’ the fall weather, but all the same, we know fall is approaching. Leaves are starting to turn, the often oppressive humidity is gone and mosquitoes are fewer in number. Every region has their own seasonal benchmarks. You may have fall hayrides, we have a decline in blood-sucking mosquitoes.

I’d love to have nothing but chili, stew and baked pasta this week, but it’s too warm for such cozy fare. Instead, we are focusing on lighter foods that still feature our seasonal fruits and vegetables. I am especially excited that I found fresh, organic Shitake mushrooms at our downtown farmer’s market! Apparently, our fall weather has been perfect for them!

I also had great success with making my own refried beans this week! It was very easy, and I used some heirloom beans leftover from making chili, so it was a good use of extra food. I made the refried beans  on the bland side so I can add whatever spices I want later. We’re using them on bean tostatas later this week along with some leftover tortillas and cheese. We also have extra corn and leftover crab meat (now frozen) from a few weeks ago and that will make a lovely corn and crab chowder. Don’t you love it when leftover foods come together in something that approximates a meal?

Our budget this week is definitely helped by Tom’s fishing success and a weekly coupon from Locals Seafood. Every little bit helps, especially when the cost of food keeps rising.

Breakfasts this week include Ezekiel bread, muffins, and probably some whole wheat buttermilk pancakes. We are using our homemade jam, which is wonderful and we will get another jar of local honey in this week’s Produce Box!

I hope you are taking advantage of some wonderful fall produce in your area (or spring if you are in the southern hemisphere!). Have a happy and healthy week!

Budget [$109.51]

  • The Produce Box (acorn squash, honey, sweet onions, lettuce, apples, corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, yellow squash, green beans, mixed sweet peppers): $48.00
  • Locals Seafood (shrimp): $10.00
  • Hilltop Farm Organics (Shitake mushrooms): $4.30
  • Mitchell Family Pantry (jam): $3.00
  • Hillsborough Cheese Company (goat cheese): $6.00
  • Trader Joes (pasta, organic rice, organic chicken, frozen fruit, almond milk, almonds): $38.21

Menu for Week 42

  • Wednesday–Roasted red pepper, mushroom and shrimp pasta, salad
  • Thursday–Leftovers (we have some left from last week!)
  • Friday–Game night–Refried bean, mushroom and cheese tostatas
  • Saturday–Corn and crab chowder
  • Sunday–Roast chicken, acorn squash with honey and sage, green beans
  • Monday–Game night–Chicken and vegetable quesadillas
  • Tuesday–Roasted whole fish, squash and zucchini saute

Shrimp and Kohlrabi Stir Fry

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Have you ever seen a strange, new vegetable at the farmer’s market and wondered what in the world to do with it? We tried a new vegetable this week–kohlrabi! I had seen it at the markets, but I had no idea how to cook it or what parts of it to cook. So, I decided to ask the folks at In Good Heart Farm. Turns out, the leaves and root are both edible and the root, once peeled, tastes like very sweet broccoli–yum! The leaves taste much like collard greens. So, I bought a bunch and used it in a shrimp stir fry with green beans and tatsoi–another sweet green. The result was quite delicious and fresh tasting. We are now checking to see if we can plant some kohlrabi in our winter garden!

Stir fry dishes are terrific for using up leftover bits of vegetables. This stir fry features some leftover green beans that didn’t get cooked last week and some fresh, baby ginger we got at the market. In addition to our kohlrabi, we used fresh tatsoi, an Asian green that is crunchy and sweet, some sweet, local onions, and some organic garlic. Topped off with local shrimp, this dish was so good that it was hard for us to stop eating! This is a great combination we will repeat in the future.

Shrimp and Kohlrabi Stir Fry (4 servings)

  • 1 sweet, organic onion, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves organic garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1″ piece of fresh, baby ginger
  • 1 tablespoon grapeseed oil
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 organic kohlrabi, the roots peeled and sliced and the leaves washed well and chopped
  • 1 large, organic carrot, peeled and sliced
  • 2 small bunches of organic tatsoi, washed, trimmed and chopped
  • 1/4 lb. fresh green beans, washed and trimmed and cut in half
  • 1 lb. fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 tablespoon organic sesame seeds
  • Organic tamari soy sauce, to taste
  • Cooked rice
  1. Make sure all ingredients are washed, cut up and ready to go–cooking will go fast!
  2. Heat the grapeseed and sesame oils in a wok or large skillet over high heat.
  3. Add the onion to the hot oil and stir fry for 1-2 minutes.
  4. Add the kohlrabi leaves and root slices and stir fry 2-3 minutes or until leaves begin to wilt.
  5. Add the garlic, ginger, carrot and green beans. Stir fry for another 2-3 minutes, tossing ingredients well.
  6. Add the tatsoi and shrimp. Toss and cook for another 2-3 minutes or until leaves are soft and the shrimp are just pink and opaque.
  7. Remove from heat, sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve over hot rice.
  8. Sprinkle with tamari, to taste.
  9. Serve immediately.

Mediterranean Shrimp and Feta

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Can you tell we love shrimp? A good number of our summer recipes revolve around shrimp and fish, both of which are available fresh from North Carolina waters. Shrimp has had a bad rep for its high cholesterol content, but interestingly, it is high in natural cholesterol and very low in fat. Studies of the effects of shrimp on cholesterol levels have shown that unlike high cholesterol, high fat foods, eating steamed, poached or roasted shrimp do not negatively impact bad cholesterol levels. Great news! Just stay away from the all-you-can-eat fried popcorn shrimp at Golden Corral. Nothing good comes of that.

This shrimp dish is unbelievably flavorful and fresh, and it comes together in about 30 minutes! The original recipe is an oldie from Southern Living, but I’ve added my own spin to it. We served this over organic rice, but pasta would be great as well.

Mediterranean Shrimp and Feta (serves 2-3)

  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 red, orange or yellow bell pepper, trimmed and sliced
  • 1 lb. fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 can organic artichoke hearts, halved
  • 4 ounces goat milk feta cheese
  • Juice of one fresh lemon
  • 1/2 cup fresh Italian flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 3 cups cooked organic rice
  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  2. Line a rimmed sheet pan with foil.
  3. Combine the first 6 ingredients in a bowl and toss well. Add to baking sheet and roast in the oven for 15 minutes.
  4. Stir vegetables gently and add shrimp and artichoke hearts. Roast for 10 more minutes.
  5. Combine feta, lemon juice and parsley in a large bowl.
  6. Add cooked shrimp mixture and any pan juices to the feta. Toss well.
  7. Serve over hot rice.

Chili Lime Shrimp Salad

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There is nothing like fresh shrimp, straight from the coast. It is hot here on North Carolina–not as hot as usual, but it is definitely summer. This salad is another in our summer series of foods that will help you stay cool and healthy in the hot weather. I love shrimp salads, but I don’t like a lot of mayonnaise on a hot day. This salad uses lime juice to keep the salad flavorful and interesting, but not heavy. I may try this again with some butterfly pasta and make a shrimp pasta salad version of this. Soooo yummy!

The original version of this recipe came from Gina’s Skinny Recipes (here). I added some fresh cucumber and some fresh corn to the mix (who doesn’t love shrimp and corn?) as well as some smoked paprika to the dressing. I also added more lime juice and left out the cilantro because I have not acquired a taste for it. All good! The version below is my version, but you could alter this to suit your own tastes!

Wondering where to buy your shrimp? Before you head out shopping check THIS past SOLE Food Kitchen post on why local shrimp is important!

Chili Lime Shrimp Salad (serves 4 as a main dish)

1 lb. shrimp
1 medium tomato, washed and chopped
1/4 cup red onion, diced
1 small cucumber, peeled and diced
1 jalapeño pepper, ribs and seeds removed, diced
1 cup fresh corn (about 1 ear)
1 avocado, peeled and diced
Zest of 1 lime
Juice of 3 limes
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
Kosher or sea salt and ground black pepper to taste

Peel and devein shrimp. Put shrimp in a deep sauté pan, cover with water and poach for 2-3 minutes, until shrimp is pink and opaque. Drain and let cool.
While shrimp is cooling, mix lime zest, juice, oil, paprika, salt and pepper together. Whisk until well combined. Set aside.
In a medium sized bowl, combine all remaining ingredients except avocado. Pour dressing over all and carefully stir the salad so all ingredients are coated with dressing.
Refrigerate for 1-2 hours.
Just prior to serving, add the avocado and stir to combine. Taste for seasoning and correct if necessary.
Serve chilled.

Other shrimp dishes:

Pasta with Shrimp, Green Beans and Tomato

Roasted Broccoli and Shrimp

Pasta with Shrimp, Asparagus and Mushrooms

Local Shrimp Pad Thai

Pasta with Shrimp, Green Beans, and Tomato

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Oh, this pasta.

So good I could have licked the bowl (and maybe I did). Chock full of summer goodness and garlicky basil pesto. I love Julia Child, but I have to say, Italians can rock out some fresh produce. And seafood. Ummm…Wait, can I have pasta for dessert?

This dish was supposed to be my supper the night before my first 10K, however due to an emergency at work, that didn’t happen. Instead, it became my post-race night supper. And it was very delicious, light, but satisfying. If you don’t like shrimp, you could use some pulled chicken instead. The green beans and tomatoes came in our Produce Box this week!

Pasta with Shrimp, Green Beans and Tomato (makes 6 servings)

  • 1 lb. pasta (we used organic casarecce pasta)
  • 1lb. shrimp, peeled
  • 1/2 lb. fresh green beans, washed, trimmed and cut into bite size pieces
  • 1/2 pint fresh cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 cup basil pesto (or more, if you like)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    1. Fill a stock pot with water and bring to a rolling boil.
    2. When pasta water is boiling, add several tablespoons of kosher salt to the pot.
    3. In a medium sauté pan, heat the olive oil at medium heat. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute.
    4. Add the pasta and beans to the boiling water. Cook according to pasta directions.
    5. Add the shrimp to the sauté pan. Cook until barely pink. Then, add the tomatoes and continue cooking until shrimp are completely pink and opaque (this should be about 3 minutes). Don’t over cook!
    6. Drain the pasta and green beans and add pasta mix to a large serving bowl. Add the shrimp and tomatoes to the bowl. Add the Parmesan cheese and pesto and mix together well.
    7. Serve immediately.
  • Roasted Broccoli and Shrimp

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    My friend Jerry sent me this recipe last year (thanks, Jerry!) and it has become a staple for us, especially when time is tight. This recipe features local, organic broccoli and NC shrimp–a simple, and amazingly good combination. Although it wasn’t in the original recipe, I sometimes add sliced red bell pepper when I have it fresh.This recipe is light, but satisfying and quite tasty. Don’t skimp on the coriander seeds or hot pepper–they infuse the entire dish and make it something special. Healthy, quick and easy to make, this recipe hits all the marks for a succesful, weeknight dinner. And even better, it only uses one bowl, a cutting board and one baking sheet, making cleanup super quick.

    A note about shrimp. I bought large-sized shrimp and 10 minutes was just right for roasting. If you buy medium or small shrimp, you may want to back off on the roasting time. If you don’t have access to local or U.S. shrimp (or you just don’t like shrimp), you could probably try this with a thick, locally available fish (here that would be tuna or swordfish) cut into chunks. Scallops might be good also!

    You could also play around with what vegetables to include, and make this a truly seasonal dish. I can’t wait to see how we can work our Produce Box veggies into this dish over the spring and summer!

    Roasted Broccoli and Shrimp a la Jerry

    This makes 3 servings or 2 servings for hungry seafood lovers!

    • 2 lbs. broccoli
    • 1 lb. fresh shrimp, shelled and deveined
    • One red bell pepper, sliced into strips
    • 4 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
    • 1 tsp. whole coriander seeds
    • 1 tsp. whole cumin seeds (or 1/2 tsp. of ground)
    • 1/8 tsp. hot chili powder (I used red pepper flakes)
    • 1 lemon, zested with lemon reserved for serving
    • Kosher salt and ground pepper to taste
    • Rice, quinoa or other cooked grains
      1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
      2. Cut the broccoli into large florets with some stem remaining.
      3. Cut the red bell pepper into strips and cut each strip in half crosswise.
      4. In a bowl, toss the broccoli florets and bell pepper with 2 Tbsp. olive oil, coriander, cumin, hot chili pepper, and salt and pepper to taste.
      5. Put broccoli and pepper mix on a rimmed baking sheet and roast for 10 minutes.
      6. In the bowl, toss shrimp with remaining 2 Tbsp. of olive oil, lemon zest and salt and pepper to taste.
      7. Add to the broccoli mix and pop back in the oven for another 10 minutes or until the shrimp is pink and opaque, but not overcooked.
      8. Serve over rice with lemon wedges and you are done!

    Pasta with Shrimp, Asparagus and Mushrooms

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    The azaleas and dogwoods are blooming, the spring pollen has coated everything with a fine dusting of yellow and asparagus are back at the farmers market. Spring is finally in full swing! It was hard to contain myself at the market this week–I see all that beautiful (and very temporary) asparagus, and I want to buy it all up. But that would be wrong. Still, I did manage to bring home some lovely, fresh-picked asparagus along with some NC shrimp from Locals Seafood for this pasta dish. I love this pasta. Satisfying, yet much lighter than our heavier winter pasta creations, this recipe was made on the fly with what we found at the market (except lemons–they do not grow here!).

    For this dish, use very good quality olive oil, butter and cheese! I’ve started buying organic butter from grass-fed cows and it is expensive, but really wonderful in a dish where you will taste the butter (and no growth hormones!). I saved the trimmings from our asparagus (I wanted more of the pretty tops and less stem in this dish) and I will use the tender stems minced in our veggie risotto tomorrow night!

    In theory, this feeds 4 people. But Tom and I were ravenous for some reason, and nearly finished the pot between the two of us, so if you have a hungry household, make a salad to go with this.

    Pasta with Shrimp, Asparagus and Mushrooms (serves 4)

    1 lb. orecchiette pasta (little ears)
    1 shallot
    2 cloves garlic
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    4 tablespoons fresh, grass-fed butter
    1 lb. medium shrimp, peeled and cleaned
    1 lb. fresh asparagus, washed and trimmed
    8 oz. fresh mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
    1 lemon zested and juiced
    1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    Kosher salt and ground pepper

    Peel and mince the shallot and garlic cloves. Set aside.
    Fill a large stock pot with water for pasta. When pasta water boils, add a healthy scoop of salt to the water along with the pasta. Lower heat to medium high and cook pasta for 10 minutes.
    While pasta is cooking, combine the olive oil and butter in a large sauté pan and melt over medium heat. When foam subsides, add shallot and garlic. Cook for 2 minutes.
    Add the asparagus and mushrooms and salt/pepper to taste. Stir and cook for about 5 minutes.
    Add the shrimp, lemon juice and zest. Cook until the shrimp are just pink. Do not overlook!
    When pasta is done, drain, reserving 1 cup of the pasta water.
    Add pasta and all vegetables to a large serving bowl. Toss, adding some pasta water to make a light sauce.
    Sprinkle with cheese and serve!

    Why You Should Buy Local Shrimp

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    We’ll be coming into shrimp season again soon! Here is a repost from our Year of Healthier Living blog about the dangers of imported shrimp.

    I love good shrimp, especially over grits or in pasta. Living in a state that produces shrimp for the rest of the country, I used to think that most of my shrimp was caught within a two-hour drive from my home. Checking grocery store sourcing, though, I found that most of it is imported. Imported!! Shrimp comes from 120 miles away, but it’s imported from Asia??? Now we get all our seafood local, thanks to Locals Seafood. I recently read a report that has me even more convinced that local shrimp is the way to go.

    The article is from Mother Jones Online and it proclaims that “Shrimp’s Carbon Footprint is 10 Times Greater Than Beef’s”. Say what??? I thought grain fed South American beef was the worst food in regards to carbon footprints, but apparently not. Highlighting Taco Bell’s $2.79 shrimp taco and Red Lobster’s “Endless Shrimp” feasts, the article focuses on America’s love of cheap, plentiful food and the practice of farm raising shrimp in Asia. Twenty years ago, 80% of the shrimp Americans consumed came from wild domestic fisheries, with an additional 20% imported. Today those percentages are flipped, with more than 90% of the shrimp we consume coming from outside the U.S. and mostly from shrimp farms throughout Asia.

    Why is that bad? Well, to read about it, apparently these foreign shrimp farms are increasingly built on former mangrove forests across Asia. The devastation of the mangroves is huge. Mangrove forests are biodiverse fisheries, where many species lay their eggs and where young fish can develop in clean waters. The cutting down of these mangrove forests results in “fetid dead zones” that are devoid of life except for what is farmed there. Mangroves are also rich in carbon. When the mangroves are destroyed, that carbon is released into the atmosphere as global warming gas. And since the farms can only be used for about 5 years until the water is too toxic and laden with pesticides, viruses and antibiotics, these shrimp factories are not at all sustainable.

    So, what is a shrimp lover to do? Well, first, back away from the shrimp taco and all-you-can-eat shrimp buffet, because the odds are good that those shrimp came from someplace pretty gross. And then buy U.S. shrimp, which are plentiful and which will support jobs in fisheries here. Domestic shrimp may be more expensive when measuring by the dollar, but they are less costly in terms of the environment and your own health. Now I just need to find a good recipe for shrimp tacos!

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