Wild Salmon Poached in Miso

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The need for this dinner started with a vacation. To Disney World. Where I ate. A lot. 

Not only did I consumer more food than usual, it was all the wrong foods, although they seemed so right at the time. Chocolate covered ice cream bars in the shape of Mickey heads, huge muffins, barbecued ribs, turkey and stuffing, cake and ice cream and a steak as big as my head. Like a wild night out on the town, it was fun at the time, but later, not so much.

Since we don’t typically eat processed food and eat little sugar, this menu left me feeling tired, bloated and sluggish. Not what I need with a half marathon just a month away. For our first week back, I’m focusing on eating light proteins, lots of fresh vegetables and adding in foods with probiotics–mainly fermented foods like miso soup, kombucha tea and kim chi. 

This recipe calls for wild caught Alaskan salmon and miso soup broth–two nutritional powerhouses that also compliment each other with their delicate flavors.

Poaching fish is very easy, healthy and pretty quick. You can use wine, juice, cider or broth as a poaching liquid. In this case, I used miso soup broth. Miso is a traditional Japanese stock made with fermented soybeans, barley and rice malt. It has a very mild flavor and is high in protein as well as vitamins and minerals. Miso also is rich in lactobacillus acidophilus, which promotes healthy tummy bacteria.

To poach the fish, I made a simple envelope out of aluminum foil, wrapped the fish in it, poured in some miso and baked the fish/miso packet for 25 minutes at 350 degrees. You can use the same process for poaching other kinds of fish, chicken or even vegetables!

I served our salmon with fresh green beans and mashed cauliflower “potatoes”. It was the spa meal our tummies craved after all the junk we had eaten. And now our bodies and our digestive systems are on their way back to normal!

Wild Salmon Poached in Miso (serves 2)

  • 1 lb. fillet of wild caught, Alaskan salmon
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup miso broth
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. On a rimmed baking sheet, place a piece of aluminum foil large enough to make a little tent up and around your fish fillet.
  3. Place the fish fillet in the center of the foil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Tent the fish fillet and fold the top edges of the “tent” down to seal.
  5. Fold one open end of the tent up and seal.
  6. Pour the poaching liquid into the remaining open side, then fold that side up and seal. You should have something that looks like a little, sealed up boat.
  7. Put the baking sheet with the fish packet into the oven and bake for about 20-25 minutes.
  8. Use caution when opening the foil packet as the steam will be hot! 
  9. Serve immediately.
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Quiche and Cocoa Channel

Paula Deen (in any iteration) has never been in my kitchen, but I do have help this week from Oprah. That’s right–Oprah. And Coco Chanel, too. These two ladies are helping me make one stylin’, yummy vegetable quiche this week (see recipe below). In fact, they’re helping me get dinner on the table without hardly a feather ruffled. For reals.

You see, Oprah and Coco Chanel are hens who have the pleasure of residing with Eric and Lisa Forehand of Water Oaks Farm in Durham (www.wateroaksfarm.org). In addition to heritage breed chickens, Lisa and Eric also love their miniature donkeys and Eric makes a wicked variety of homebrew. I don’t think I have ever seen chickens get so much love and care (I’m pretty sure Eric puts that much love into his beer, as well).

When the big ol’ reincarnation happens for me, I want to come back as a chicken or donkey at Water Oaks Farm. Except I want my name to be Angelina Jolie.

Happy chickens laying happy eggs. If you’re not all about “happy,” but you are all about health, consider buying locally produced cage free eggs because:

  • They taste better. WAAAAAAY better.
  • They have more protein than mass-produced eggs because the hen’s diet is richer.
  • You will support your local economy, not an agribusiness.
  • You may help perpetuate heritage breed fowl, which keeps our genetic population of chickens healthier and more diverse.

Here is my “go-to” recipe for quiche. It is by far and away the best quiche recipe I have ever made and is much more like a traditional French quiche (light and custardy) than most dense restaurant quiches. The trick is to use vegetables that are dry, so cook veggies ahead and squeeze the dickens out of them before adding to the quiche. Bon Appetite!

Spinach Quiche

  • Pastry dough or 1 frozen deep dish pie crust
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup milk
  • 8 oz. swiss and Gruyère cheese mix (check Trader Joes on this)
  • 1 bag spinach or other greens cooked and squeezed of all excess water
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  1. Prepare pastry and refrigerate until ready to use.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  3. Heat olive oil in a pan and cook onions over medium heat until soft and slightly browned (about 5 min.). Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel.
  4. Add spinach to pan and cook until very wilted. Toss spinach frequently to keep from scorching. When greens have collapsed and are fully cooked, remove from pan and put onto a towel or paper towel. Roll the towel up and squeeze as much liquid as you can out of the greens (if you use frozen greens, you will need to do this as well once the greens are defrosted). Do NOT skip this step.
  5. In a medium bowl, whisk eggs, cream and milk until blended. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add cheese and stir until combined.
  6. Take the pastry crust from the refrigerator and arrange the onions and spinach on the pastry.
  7. Pour the egg mixture into the pastry.
  8. Sprinkle nutmeg across the top of the quiche.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees about 30-40 minutes–until top is golden and puffy and the quiche does not “wobble” in the center when gently moved.
  10. Serve immediately. Bow and accept the culinary accolades from your family. Make sure to thank Oprah and Coco Chanel.
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