Creamy, Deviled Eggs

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Pretty eggs on a bed of carrot greens and sprinkled with chopped chives. Happy spring!

There is nothing quite like deviled eggs in the springtime. I absolutely love them. Their light, fresh taste is a wonderful antidote to all the heavy, warming foods of winter. And as far as recipes go, you can’t get much easier–just simmer, peel, mix and stuff. And if you have leftovers (you won’t)? Mash ’em all together and voila! Egg salad.

I’m on the lookout for a vintage deviled egg plate– they go against all my rules of the kitchen (no fussy equipment, no single purpose dish ware), but they are so cute that I have trouble resisting them. Usually the price acts as a deterrent all by itself!

I made these eggs for Easter supper. Sans a cute egg plate, I used carrot greens from fresh carrots to create a bed for my eggs so they wouldn’t slide off the tray. It would be a sad, sad Easter indeed to spend my morning cleaning up splattered egg remains. My solution turned out well and the greens looked pretty with the eggs, so maybe that will become a thing now. Or maybe I’ll just get a deviled egg plate.

Now, here’s the thing about deviled eggs, especially in the South. Everyone and their mama has a special way to make them. Paprika or without, pickles or without, celery or without, and don’t get me started on mayonnaise (I’m a Duke’s girl myself). So, with that in mind, this is MY recipe for deviled eggs, but if your mama or memaw has a cherished recipe, use that. Hers will always be better than anything you read on a blog.

I like my eggs simple and very creamy. I don’t add veggies for crunch, I don’t like pickle juice and I go light on the salt. I do, however, make an occasional exception for a bit of curry and a sprinkle of chives works, too. I like to pipe my filling into the shells, because I think it looks pretty, but spooning it in works just as well and tastes the same.

This is a recipe where eggs are the star, so now is the time to pay up and buy fresh, farm eggs from pasture raised chickens.

Creamy, Deviled Eggs (makes 24 egg halves)

  • 1 dozen eggs, preferably from a known farmer who lets chickens be chickens
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup of good quality mayonnaise
  • 1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
  • Garnish: paprika, chopped chives, crumbled bacon
  1. Put eggs in a large stock pot. Very carefully fill the pot with cold water to cover the eggs plus 1″.
  2. Heat the pot over medium high heat until water comes almost to a boil (do not boil!).
  3. Reduce heat to medium and simmer eggs for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Use a slotted spoon or spider to remove eggs from hot water to a colander. Put colander in the refrigerator for 10 minutes.
  5. To peel eggs: place the colander in a clean sink and let cold water run over eggs. One at a time, take an egg and gently tap it on the counter all around the surface of the egg. Holding the egg under the running water, gently peel the shell away from the egg white. The goal is to have a pretty egg white, but they will still taste good if some of the white peels away.
  6. Reserve peeled eggs in a large bowl.
  7. When all eggs are peeled, use a sharp paring knife to cut each egg in half lengthwise. Pop the yolks out and add them to a medium mixing bowl. Carefully put the egg whites on a prepared serving plate or deviled egg plate and set aside.
  8. To the yolks in the bowl, add 1/4 cup of mayonnaise, the mustard, vinegar and salt. Mix well, breaking up any large pieces of yolk. If the mixture is too dry, add mayonnaise until you have the desired consistency. Taste and correct for seasoning.
  9. Spoon filling into egg white halves or put filling in a piping bag and use a large star tip to pipe filling into egg halves.
  10. Garnish with a sprinkle of paprika, chopped chives, crumbled bacon or whatever makes you happy.
  11. Keep chilled until ready to eat. Serve cold.

Week 13 Budget and Menu

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As we cruise on into the Holy Week of Easter and March Madness, we are hoping for spring weather, but all we see is leftover winter. And you know how leftovers are, right? At first, they seem like yummy gifts, then they seem more like an obligation and finally you start to resent their very presence in your refrigerator. I’m like that with the weather right now. In August, I’ll be complaining about the heat, but right now, the cold weather just seems wrong. I want to grill something while I’m watching my bracket helplessly implode, not huddle around a pot of stew. And Miami? It’s all riding on you. No pressure or anything, but mama needs a new cast iron Dutch oven. Let’s get it right, people. Ok? Ok.

Moving on back to food, our farmer’s markets are still offering the usual late winter variety of root vegetables, greens and potatoes. There isn’t a whole lot of excitement right now in regards to veggies, although from the photo above, you can tell that our farmers are trying to maintain enthusiasm!

In a few weeks, I’ll begin my “What’s Fresh at the Market” postings, but at this point, it’s all the same list. Our menu this week is still making the most of what we have in our garden and pantry, but I’m trying to change things up a bit so we don’t get bored. We’ve got some solid standby’s with fish tacos and shrimp pad Thai, as well as some new recipes with the Brussels sprout salad and sweet potato/chipotle pepper soup. It should be a tasty week!

As for our budget, we are definitely over. We’re having another week of seafood from our NC waters, but it did up our budget (plus we added more dried fruit to make energy bars). On the bright side, I found raw cashews at Trader Joes for $6.99 a pound–half of what Whole Foods charges!!! More raw double fudge in our future!

Budget [$111.93]

  • Mae Farm (bacon): $7.00
  • Locals Seafood (fish, shrimp): $18.00
  • Various farmer’s market vendors (onions, new crop pecans, Brussels sprouts, sweet potato): $14.00
  • Rare Earth Farm (buttermilk, eggs): $9.00

  • Trader Joes (blue cheese, chipotle peppers, portabello mushrooms, Asian noodles, scallions, frozen fruit, yogurt, soy milk): $55.93
  • Whole Foods (heirloom beans, dates): $8.00

Menu

  • Sunday–Roasted Brussels sprouts salad with bacon, blue cheese and pecans, deviled farm eggs
  • Monday–Fish tacos with sweet potato/chipotle pepper soup
  • Tuesday–Heirloom beans with bacon and caramelized onions
  • Wednesday–Girl Scouts; leftover beans and rice
  • Thursday–Heather’s easy shrimp pad Thai
  • Friday–Pan seared whiting with tomatoes and sauteed greens
  • Saturday–Portabello and seared steak “pizzas” with leftover blue cheese
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