Deviled Eggs with Shrimp

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Most of the time, I leave sacred holiday food alone. I mean, why mess around with something you know is good? My family loves deviled eggs and they are mostly purists–nothing fancy, nothing crazy. But this year, I tempted fate by offering a variation on our usual deviled eggs featuring fresh, locally caught shrimp. We purchased the shrimp from Locals Seafood, a terrific, local company that brings us fresh, North Carolina seafood several times a week. The result was very tasty and beautiful!

A note about the shrimp shells. Use the opportunity to make some homemade seafood stock! Get double benefit from poaching the shrimp by reserving the poaching liquid, adding back in enough water to make a quart of liquid (or so–you don’t have to be exact). Add the shrimp shells, two stalks of celery , peppercorns and 1/2 onion. Simmer for 45 minutes, strain and let cool. Freeze for up to 6 months.

Deviled Eggs with Shrimp (makes 12 egg halves)

  • 12 medium raw shrimp, shells on
  • 1/2 lemon, cut into 4 pieces
  • 2 sprigs fresh dill
  • 6 farm fresh eggs
  • 1/2 cup real mayonnaise
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  1. Put the shrimp, one sprig of dill and the lemon in a saucepan and cover with water. Heat shrimp over medium high until shrimp is pink and opaque. Do not overcook.
  2. Drain shrimp, let cool and remove the shells (save the shells for making seafood stock!).
  3. Leave shrimp in the refrigerator until you are ready for them.
  4. Put the eggs in the saucepan and cover with water. Bring water to a boil, then cover, turn off the heat and let the pot sit for 15 minutes.
  5. Drain the eggs and run under cold water to stop the cooking process. Leave the eggs in the refrigerator for 15 minutes or so.
  6. Peel the eggs. Cut each egg in half lengthwise and pop the yolks into a medium mixing bowl. Move the empty whites to a serving platter.
  7. Mash the yolks with a fork. Mix with mayonnaise, salt and pepper until smooth. Add more mayonnaise if needed. Scoop the egg yolk mixture into the egg white shells or use a piping bag, if you want to be fancy.
  8. Just prior to serving, top each deviled egg with one poached shrimp and a small piece of dill.

Creamy, Deviled Eggs

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Pretty eggs on a bed of carrot greens and sprinkled with chopped chives. Happy spring!

There is nothing quite like deviled eggs in the springtime. I absolutely love them. Their light, fresh taste is a wonderful antidote to all the heavy, warming foods of winter. And as far as recipes go, you can’t get much easier–just simmer, peel, mix and stuff. And if you have leftovers (you won’t)? Mash ’em all together and voila! Egg salad.

I’m on the lookout for a vintage deviled egg plate– they go against all my rules of the kitchen (no fussy equipment, no single purpose dish ware), but they are so cute that I have trouble resisting them. Usually the price acts as a deterrent all by itself!

I made these eggs for Easter supper. Sans a cute egg plate, I used carrot greens from fresh carrots to create a bed for my eggs so they wouldn’t slide off the tray. It would be a sad, sad Easter indeed to spend my morning cleaning up splattered egg remains. My solution turned out well and the greens looked pretty with the eggs, so maybe that will become a thing now. Or maybe I’ll just get a deviled egg plate.

Now, here’s the thing about deviled eggs, especially in the South. Everyone and their mama has a special way to make them. Paprika or without, pickles or without, celery or without, and don’t get me started on mayonnaise (I’m a Duke’s girl myself). So, with that in mind, this is MY recipe for deviled eggs, but if your mama or memaw has a cherished recipe, use that. Hers will always be better than anything you read on a blog.

I like my eggs simple and very creamy. I don’t add veggies for crunch, I don’t like pickle juice and I go light on the salt. I do, however, make an occasional exception for a bit of curry and a sprinkle of chives works, too. I like to pipe my filling into the shells, because I think it looks pretty, but spooning it in works just as well and tastes the same.

This is a recipe where eggs are the star, so now is the time to pay up and buy fresh, farm eggs from pasture raised chickens.

Creamy, Deviled Eggs (makes 24 egg halves)

  • 1 dozen eggs, preferably from a known farmer who lets chickens be chickens
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup of good quality mayonnaise
  • 1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
  • Garnish: paprika, chopped chives, crumbled bacon
  1. Put eggs in a large stock pot. Very carefully fill the pot with cold water to cover the eggs plus 1″.
  2. Heat the pot over medium high heat until water comes almost to a boil (do not boil!).
  3. Reduce heat to medium and simmer eggs for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Use a slotted spoon or spider to remove eggs from hot water to a colander. Put colander in the refrigerator for 10 minutes.
  5. To peel eggs: place the colander in a clean sink and let cold water run over eggs. One at a time, take an egg and gently tap it on the counter all around the surface of the egg. Holding the egg under the running water, gently peel the shell away from the egg white. The goal is to have a pretty egg white, but they will still taste good if some of the white peels away.
  6. Reserve peeled eggs in a large bowl.
  7. When all eggs are peeled, use a sharp paring knife to cut each egg in half lengthwise. Pop the yolks out and add them to a medium mixing bowl. Carefully put the egg whites on a prepared serving plate or deviled egg plate and set aside.
  8. To the yolks in the bowl, add 1/4 cup of mayonnaise, the mustard, vinegar and salt. Mix well, breaking up any large pieces of yolk. If the mixture is too dry, add mayonnaise until you have the desired consistency. Taste and correct for seasoning.
  9. Spoon filling into egg white halves or put filling in a piping bag and use a large star tip to pipe filling into egg halves.
  10. Garnish with a sprinkle of paprika, chopped chives, crumbled bacon or whatever makes you happy.
  11. Keep chilled until ready to eat. Serve cold.
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