Orecchiette with Asparagus and Smoked Salmon

20140712-111932-40772767.jpgWhen I was growing up in the 1970s, there were four kinds of pasta know to us in suburbia: spaghetti, macaroni, lasagna noodles and, if we were feeling very exotic, manicotti. That was pretty much our full repertoire of Italian pasta (I’m not counting Chef Boyardee ravioli because I don’t think it counts as any distinct food group at all). I was well into adulthood before I experimented with pasta dishes that didn’t involve meaty tomato sauce or tons of cheese. Now, however, I love to experiment with all kinds of pasta dishes as well as pasta shapes. On our trip to Italy, Tom and I had the opportunity to try many local pasta dishes that we continue to make at home–none of them drowning in sauce and all of them featuring fresh, seasonal vegetables and seafood. Yum. It was astounding the variety of shapes and sizes of pasta available in Italy. I wanted to fill my suitcase with them!

One of my favorite pasta shapes is orecchiette (or “little ears”) pasta. Shaped somewhat like a little hat, this pasta holds sauce well and is very satisfying. I think you can find this pretty much anywhere now, but if you can’t find it, you can easily substitute penne.

Now that we are seriously increasing our running mileage, I am trying to incorporate more pasta dishes into our meals. This dish is one we experimented with this week and it is really delicious! I’m a huge fan of smoked salmon, but you could easily substitute some grilled or pan seared salmon instead and it would be fabulous (or shrimp…or chicken…pasta is flexible that way). We have been lucky to score some local mushrooms this week and we added them to the dish for an earthier, meatier flavor. So good!

Give this a try for a nice summer supper!

Orecchiette with Asparagus and Smoked Salmon (serves 4-6)

  • 16 oz. orecchiette pasta
  • 2 tbsp. organic butter
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2-3 cups fresh mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • 1 lb. fresh asparagus, trimmed
  • 4 oz. smoked salmon
  • Zest of 1 organic lemon
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • Freshly grated or shaved Parmesan cheese
  1. In a stock pot, bring heavily salted pasta water to a boil.
  2. Add orecchiette to the stock pot and cook according to directions (12-13 minutes)
  3. In a large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over medium heat until butter is melted and begins to foam.
  4. Peel and mince the garlic. Add to the saute pan. Cook 1 minute.
  5. Add the sliced mushrooms and saute for 3-4 minutes.
  6. Chop the asparagus into bite sized pieces and add to the mushrooms. Cook an additional 3-4 minutes.
  7. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  8. Pull or chop the smoked salmon into bite sized pieces and add the salmon and lemon zest to the saute pan.
  9. Heat for 2-3 minutes until salmon is warm and vegetables are cooked, but still a bit crisp.
  10. Reserve 1 cup of pasta water and set aside. Drain the pasta and add to the saute pan. Toss all together until well combined.
  11. Add small amounts of the pasta water as necessary to make a light sauce. Correct seasonings if needed.
  12. Serve immediately with a sprinkle of freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

 

 

Chili Lime Shrimp Salad

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There is nothing like fresh shrimp, straight from the coast. It is hot here on North Carolina–not as hot as usual, but it is definitely summer. This salad is another in our summer series of foods that will help you stay cool and healthy in the hot weather. I love shrimp salads, but I don’t like a lot of mayonnaise on a hot day. This salad uses lime juice to keep the salad flavorful and interesting, but not heavy. I may try this again with some butterfly pasta and make a shrimp pasta salad version of this. Soooo yummy!

The original version of this recipe came from Gina’s Skinny Recipes (here). I added some fresh cucumber and some fresh corn to the mix (who doesn’t love shrimp and corn?) as well as some smoked paprika to the dressing. I also added more lime juice and left out the cilantro because I have not acquired a taste for it. All good! The version below is my version, but you could alter this to suit your own tastes!

Wondering where to buy your shrimp? Before you head out shopping check THIS past SOLE Food Kitchen post on why local shrimp is important!

Chili Lime Shrimp Salad (serves 4 as a main dish)

  • 1 lb. shrimp
  • 1 medium tomato, washed and chopped
  • 1/4 cup red onion, diced
  • 1 small cucumber, peeled and diced
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, ribs and seeds removed, diced
  • 1 cup fresh corn (about 1 ear)
  • 1 avocado, peeled and diced
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • Juice of 3 limes
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • Kosher or sea salt and ground black pepper to taste
  1. Peel and devein shrimp. Put shrimp in a deep sauté pan, cover with water and poach for 2-3 minutes, until shrimp is pink and opaque. Drain and let cool.
  2. While shrimp is cooling, mix lime zest, juice, oil, paprika, salt and pepper together. Whisk until well combined. Set aside.
  3. In a medium sized bowl, combine all remaining ingredients except avocado. Pour dressing over all and carefully stir the salad so all ingredients are coated with dressing.
  4. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours.
  5. Just prior to serving, add the avocado and stir to combine. Taste for seasoning and correct if necessary.
  6. Serve chilled.

Other shrimp dishes:

Pasta with Shrimp, Green Beans and Tomato

Roasted Broccoli and Shrimp

Pasta with Shrimp, Asparagus and Mushrooms

Local Shrimp Pad Thai

Fish with Fennel and Tomato

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This is an oldie, but a goodie! Just made this again this weekend and was reminded of how wonderful I few simple ingredients can be!

Someday, I am going to retire and move to Italy. In my mind, that retirement includes doing yoga on the sunny balcony of an apartment in Cinque Terre, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. And shopping in the weekly market to buy fresh cheese and produce and local olives, capers, tomatoes and fish. And socializing with the other local old people who gather at the market. That image of coastal Italian splendor often helps me get through challenging days. It’s a nice mental happy place that includes food!

This recipe may become the tangible representation of my idyllic dream. With some fresh fish from Locals Seafood, local, organic fennel, fresh local tomatoes and parsley and thyme from our garden, this is a quick, summertime winner. If you want to grill your fish, you could do that and make the sauce in a separate dish–easy!

Fish with Tomato and Fennel (4 servings)

  • 4 fish fillets (we have used Spanish mackerel and swordfish with equal success)
  • 1/4 cup high quality olive oil
  • 1 bulb fennel, trimmed and chopped
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 cloves organic garlic, peeled and minced
  • 6 plum tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup unpitted olives (optional)
  • 1/4 cup capers, rinsed (optional)
  • 1/2 cup chopped Italian, flat leaf parsley
  • Kosher or sea salt and pepper to taste
  1. Heat the olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat. Add the fennel and cook without browning until it is soft (about 15 minutes). Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  2. Add the thyme and garlic and cook an additional 1 minute. Stir well.
  3. Add the chopped tomatoes, olives and capers to the pan. Raise the heat a bit and cook until the mixture is thick, but not dry (about 15 minutes depending on how much liquid your tomatoes hold). Reserve and keep warm.
  4. Cook fish to your preference (I pan seared ours, but grilling would be great also).
  5. Plate the fish and top with the tomato and fennel sauce. Garnish with parsley.
  6. Pour yourself a glass of wine, inhale the delicious aroma and dream…

Roasted Red Pepper and Goat Cheese Pasta

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Tom and I are starting our Jeff Galloway half-marathon training program next week and I am busy reading about foods that will help fuel us without weighing us down. I know pasta is considered a “no-no” in many circles, but whole grain pasta just can’t be beat for giving me long lasting carb energy.

This pasta recipe came about from a Pinterest pin by Lauren’s Latest. The original recipe for Roasted Red Pepper and Goat Cheese Alfredo sounded so good, I couldn’t wait to try it. Fortunately, our peppers here are going crazy this fall, so beautiful sweet red peppers are quite affordable at the farmers markets. I increased the amount of red bell pepper and added some fresh shrimp and some local, organic Shitake mushrooms, but otherwise I stuck pretty close to the original recipe.

The result was a light and delicious pasta that had a fresh taste, but also had the rich taste of the goat cheese. We used some basil-black pepper local goat cheese from the Hillsborough Cheese Company, and it was super with the red peppers.

Roasted Red Pepper and Goat Cheese Pasta (makes four servings)

  • 1/2 lb. spaghetti pasta
  • 3 large red bell peppers
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1tablespoon grapeseed oil
  • 1 sweet onion, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 cup fat free half and half
  • 4 ounces goat cheese
  • 1/2 cup grated asiago cheese
  • 6-8 fresh, Shitake mushrooms, stems removed and sliced
  • 1 lb. fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined
  1. Heat a gas grill to high.
  2. While grill is heating, toss the whole bell peppers with the tablespoon of olive oil. Using tongs, put the peppers on the hot grill. Cover and let cook for about 8 minutes, turning peppers every 3-4 minutes. Peppers are done when the skin is charred all over.
  3. Put the hot peppers in a large bowl and cover the bowl with a lid or a plate. Let steam for about 15 minutes.
  4. Put a stock pot of water on to boil (for pasta).
  5. While peppers are cooling, heat the grapeseed oil in a deep skillet. Add the onions and cook for 3-4 minutes, until soft.
  6. While onions are cooking, remove the charred skins, stems and seeds from the roasted peppers. Chop the peppers and add them to the skillet. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute more, stirring well.
  7. Add the cup of half and half, asiago and the goat cheese. Stir until cheese is melted, about 3 minutes or so.
  8. Pour the mixture into a blender or CAREFULLY use an immersion blender to puree the pepper/goat cheese mixture (NOTE: my pan was too shallow, making a splattery mess once I cranked up the immersion blender. I ended up pouring the mixture into a large, deep bowl, pureeing it, and returning it to the pan.)
  9. Cook the pasta according to directions.
  10. While pasta cooks, add the shrimp and mushrooms to the blended sauce, and cook until shrimp are pink and opaque–about 6 minutes.
  11. Drain the pasta and add pasta to the pan with the sauce. Toss to coat the pasta well.
  12. Serve immediately. Garnish with fresh parsley or more cheese.

Pesto Pasta e Fagioli e Patatina

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One of the most memorable meals I have ever had was in Corniglia, Italy, while Tom and I were hiking the Cinque Terre (if you haven’t done this, consider putting it on your bucket list). We had a simple lunch at a small restaurant operated by a woman in her 70s. She made everything herself and grew the vegetables in her garden. There was no menu, just a few daily specials that took advantage of what was in season.

A huge part of what made the experience so wonderful is that we ate on a patio outside looking out at the Mediterranean Sea. Far from the Olive Garden, billion calorie, sauce-laden pastas in America, the pasta we had was typical of the region–homemade pasta tossed with a light basil pesto and bits of potato and green beans. Delicious, satisfying and fresh. After hiking an hour and climbing almost 400 stairs to get to Corniglia, we were famished and ready to tuck in. When we finished our wonderful meal, we continued on our hike with renewed physical and emotional energy.

This recipe calls for all that is wonderful about summer–fresh potatoes, green beans, basil and (I veered from the traditional recipe) sun dried tomatoes. Yum!

Pesto Pasta e Fagioli e Patatina

  • 1 lb. fresh or dried capallini or fettucine pasta
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 c. basil pesto (see below)
  • 6-8 small red potatoes
  • 1 c. green beans, topped and tailed and cut in 1/2
  • 1/4 cup sun dried tomatoes packed in oil, chopped
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  1. Put a stock pot of water on the stove to boil.
  2. While water is heating, wash your potatoes and cut them into bite size pieces.
  3. When water comes to a boil, add salt and the potatoes. Boil potatoes for about 10 minutes.
  4. Add the green beans and pasta to the pot and continue to boil everything for 8-9 minutes.
  5. Reserve 1 c. of the pasta water and drain the pasta and vegetables.
  6. Pour the pasta and vegetable mixture into a large bowl. Add the pesto, parmesan cheese and sun dried tomato. Toss to combine, adding pasta water if needed to thicken the sauce.

Basil Pesto

  • 3 c. fresh basil
  • 1 c. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 c. pine nuts
  • 2/3 c. grated Parmesan cheese
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 Tsp. lemon juice
  1. Put basil and about 2 Tbsp. olive oil in a blender or food processor. Blend into a paste.
  2. Add pine nuts, cheese, garlic and remaining oil. Blend until smooth.

Basil pesto should be made fresh and used the same day. Or, you can freeze pesto (this works very well if you buy a plastic ice cube tray and freeze the pesto in the trays–just pop out a cube and use in a sauce!).

Banana Pudding Refrigerator Oatmeal

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During our long, hot summers, I typically have sprouted grain bread/toast with homemade jam and a frozen fruit smoothie for breakfast. While I absolutely love steel cut oatmeal, the thought of making or eating hot oats before heading out into the humidity is just not appealing.

So I was intrigued by the experiments of a fellow blogger, Melissa at My Whole Food Life. She has been blogging all summer about no-cook refrigerator oatmeal recipes. I posted a list of links below! Like the whole chia seed thing, it took me a while to work myself up to eating cold oatmeal (yes, you can heat it in the microwave, but follow along with me here). Wouldn’t cold oatmeal be gross? Could the overnight process really soften the steel-cut oats? What would cold oatmeal taste like?

There was only one way to find out, and since I ran out of food a day short of grocery shopping day, this was the week for brave new discoveries! Armed with a very ripe banana, some steel-cut oats and some almond milk, I decided to put a southern recipe to the test with this Banana Pudding Refrigerator Oatmeal. In keeping with Melissa’s recipe proportions, I added chia seeds, vanilla bean and one chopped medjool date for sweetness. The date pieces dissolve a bit and taste like caramel. YUM!

How was it? Chock full of cold banana and creamy oats, this banana oatmeal won’t fool you into thinking it’s banana pudding, but it is clean tasting, filling and a little sweet. More like rice pudding? I am enjoying taking my jar of oatmeal from the staff refrigerator, to the great outdoors for some al fresco lunches. These late summer days are still pretty warm, so the cold oatmeal is appreciated. It is refreshing and not at all gross, like I feared. When winter comes, you can pop your jar of oats into the microwave and have a warm lunch in no time.

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Banana Pudding Refrigerator Oatmeal (makes one pint-sized serving)

  • 1/2 cup steel-cut oats (you can use rolled oats for a softer texture)
  • 1 teaspoon organic chia seeds
  • 1 large banana (or two small), peeled and slightly mashed
  • Seeds from 1 vanilla bean or 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 organic medjool date, pitted and chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups almond milk

Combine all ingredients in a bowl or in a pint sized jar. Shake well. Refrigerate overnight or up to three days.

Want some more ideas? Check out these recipes from My Whole Food Life!

Almond Butter Chocolate Overnight Oats

Apple Cinnamon Overnight Oats

Coconut Vanilla Overnight Oats

Kimchi Fried Rice

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Fermented foods are so, so good for us, and of all the wonderful fermented treats (sauerkraut, pickles, kefir, kimchi), I think Korean kimchi is my favorite. Kimchi is a spicy, fermented cabbage dish, and it is ridiculously delicious. Chock full of vitamins A, B and C as well as probiotic lactobacilli (good for your gut), kimchi is flavorful, low in fat and high in fiber. In this dish, kimchi takes center stage in a healthy fried rice dish topped with a lightly cooked, fresh farm egg. You can make your own kimchi, which I may eventually try, but mine came from Kimbap, a new restaurant in Raleigh that features fresh, farm-to-table food grown in North Carolina. Yum!

We made enough for three people because there are just three of us, but you can easily add more rice and kimchi to expand your servings. When cooking your eggs, make sure to keep the yolks runny–the yolk makes a delicious addition to the rice.

Kimchi Fried Rice (makes 3 serving)

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 sweet, organic onion, peeled and chopped
  • 6 ounce grass fed, flat iron steak, sliced thin.
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 cups kimchi
  • 3-4 cups cooked organic jasmine rice
  • 3 fresh, farm eggs
  • 1/4 cup Korean bean paste sauce or chili sauce
  1. In a large skillet or wok, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over high heat.
  2. Add onion and stir fry quickly for 1 minute.
  3. Add the steak and continue stir frying for 1-2 minutes. Add the soy sauce, second tablespoon of olive oil, and garlic. Continue cooking for another 2 minutes.
  4. Add the kimchi and stir fry for about 3-4 minutes.
  5. Add the cooked rice and stir fry until rice is a bit crispy, about 4 minutes (this will depend on how much liquid you have in the pot).
  6. Turn the heat off and let pot sit over the heat.
  7. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat. Cook the eggs by lightly frying them until the whites are cooked and the yolks are still runny.
  8. Add rice to serving bowls, top each with a cooked egg and serve with bean paste or chili sauce.

Fig and Almond Buttermilk Cake

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I’ll be the first to admit that the photos of this cake do not do it justice. I’m still working on my food photography skills and this one just didn’t work out. I’m hoping to make it again and hopefully get some better photos up. For now, you’ll have to trust me that this simple, one layer cake is freakin’ amazing. I used our buttermilk cake recipe from HERE and adapted it for a combination of figs and almonds. The resulting cake was incredibly moist, but light. The figs baked into the cake and almost melted. Wanting to try cake for breakfast? This is a good choice!

This cake used whole wheat pastry flour and coconut sugar, making it much darker in color than it would be with all purpose flour and white cane sugar. If you haven’t tried coconut sugar yet, this would be a great recipe with which to start. Coconut sugar is a minimally processed sugar that is sustainably harvested from the sap of coconut trees. Unlike cane sugar or even brown sugar, coconut sugar is a low glycemic food (glycemic index of 35) that has 36 times the amount of iron as brown sugar and 16 amino acids. It is also high in potassium, magnesium, zinc, vitamin B1, B2, B3 and B6. It is considered safe to use for diabetics and can be used as a replacement for cane sugar in 1:1 ratio. Because it is very dark in color, your baking will also take on a rich, dark brown color, so keep that in mind. I don’t particularly care, but if you are baking a white cake, you’ll want to know that in advance.

I dare you to open a bag of coconut sugar, take a deep inhale, and NOT fall in love. I. Dare. You.

Enjoy the figs of late summer! I hope to make this cake a few more times before fig season is officially over. And maybe–well probably–have it for breakfast 🙂

Fig and Almond Buttermilk Cake (makes one 9″ round cake)

  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 stick unsalted, organic butter, softened
  • 1 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 large farm egg
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 pint fresh, organic figs, trimmed and cut in half lengthwise
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Grease and flour a 9″ round cake pan. Set aside.
  3. In a small mixing bowl, blend the first four ingredients. Set aside.
  4. In the bowl of a mixer, combine the softened butter and the sugar and beat well for about 2 minutes.
  5. Add the vanilla, almond extract and egg to the butter mixture and beat until blended.
  6. With the mixer on low, alternately add the flour and buttermilk, starting and ending with the flour. Mix until just blended.
  7. Add the batter to the pan, spreading evenly. Top with the fig halves and almond slices.
  8. Bake for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick poked in the center comes out clean.
  9. Cool cake in the pan for 10 minutes, then remove cake to a cooling rack to cool completely.
  10. Serve slightly warm.

Fig and Goat Cheese Pizza

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Seeing figs at the farmer’s market is a bittersweet thing. On the one hand, I love figs, and I’m almost out of Sticky Fig Jam, so I’m ready to get moving to make some more. On the other hand, the arrival of figs means the end of summer, which is always a sad time for me. Recipes like this Fig and Goat Cheese Pizza give me a reason to smile, though! This pizza is incredibly simple and very, very tasty. The way the end of summer should be, right?

For this pizza, I used fresh, local goat cheese and onions and figs from our farmer’s market. The onions in this recipe are caramelized quickly using a “cheat” of vinegar and sugar, but you can skip the sugar if you want–it gives the onions the flavor of caramelization without the long cooking time, but you can do what works for you. Don’t skimp on the balsamic vinegar though–the pairing of the vinegar with the onions and the cheese is pretty spectacular. We used coconut sugar in our recipe, mostly because we have it handy and I am totally in love with it. It is sustainably produced and has a flavor almost like brown sugar, but is minimally processed and closer to a natural state. I wouldn’t buy it just for this pizza, but it’s worth trying in all kinds of baked dishes.

Fig and Goat Cheese Pizza (Serves 2)

  • 1 recipe whole wheat pizza crust (see below or use your own)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large, sweet organic onion, cleaned and sliced thin
  • 1/4 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon coconut sugar (or organic, unbleached cane sugar)
  • 2 tablespoons good quality balsamic vinegar
  • 6 ounces goat cheese
  • 10-12 fresh organic figs, trimmed and cut lengthwise into thirds
  • 1 cup grated, fresh Parmesan cheese
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Prepare pizza dough and let rise according to recipe directions.
  3. In a medium size skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and cook over medium heat for about 5 minutes or until translucent and soft. Sprinkle with salt to help the onion release its juices (this will help keep it from browning too fast). Reduce heat if onion starts to brown or burn.
  4. Add balsamic vinegar and sugar to the onion, reduce heat to low and let simmer for about 20 minutes. Stir frequently and make sure onion does not burn.
  5. Stretch and shape the pizza dough into your desired shape onto a baking sheet or pizza stone (our pizzas are almost never really round, and we are okay with that!).
  6. Mash the goat cheese and distribute evenly over the pizza dough surface.
  7. Top the goat cheese with the caramelized onions.
  8. Arrange the fig slices on top of the goat cheese. Top the pizza with the Parmesan cheese.
  9. Bake at 400 degrees for 12-15 minutes or until the crust is cooked and the cheese is bubbly and melted.
  10. Serve immediately.

Skinny Chicken Taco Casserole

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This casserole is a wonderful combination of a beefy casserole I saw on Pinterest by Skinny Mom (www.skinnymom.com) and a crock pot chicken taco filling I’ve seen so many times on Pinterest that I have no idea who to cite as the creator. I thought both looked good, so I combined them into a delicious taco pasta casserole that stretches one pack of chicken over several meals and made good use of the corn, sweet peppers, hot peppers, tomatoes, onion and garlic from our local farmers. Even the goat cheese (Hillsborough Cheese Company) and hoop cheese were locally produced!

The next time, I might add some chipotle peppers in adobo sauce to make it even more spicy, but if you have little ones or sensitive taste buds, this should not be too spicy. You could certainly substitute whatever fresh vegetables you have handy! Enjoy!

Chicken Taco Casserole (makes 10-12 servings)

  • 1 lb. organic, boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 6 ounces homemade tomato salsa
  • 2 packets taco seasoning
  • 1 lb. whole wheat penne pasta
  • 2 medium, sweet organic onions, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves organic garlic, peeled and minced
  • 3 sweet bell peppers, washed and chopped
  • 2 jalapeños, seeded and chopped
  • 1 pint organic cherry tomatoes, washed and stemmed
  • Fresh organic corn from 3 ears
  • 8 ounces jalapeño goat cheese
  • 3 cups grated hoop cheese or Mexican style blend
  1. In the bowl of a slow cooker, add chicken breasts, salsa and one packet of taco seasoning. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 4 hours. Use 2 forks to pull chicken apart. Alternately, you can bake the chicken, salsa and spices for one hour, covered, at 350 degrees.
  2. While chicken is cooking, sauté onion, garlic, and peppers until soft, about 10 minutes.
  3. Add the jalapeños, tomatoes corn and remaining taco seasoning and cook for an additional 10 minutes. Set aside.
  4. In a large stock pot, bring water to boil for pasta. Cook pasta according to directions and drain.
  5. Add pasta, pulled chicken and vegetable mix to the stock pot and combine well. Add goat cheese and 2 cups of hoop cheese, and stir until cheese is melted and creamy.
  6. Pour pasta mix into an 11 x 13 casserole dish. Top with remaining cup of cheese.
  7. Bake at 350 for 45 minutes or until hot and bubbly.
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