Whole Wheat Buttermilk Spice Muffins

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These muffins are more like dessert than breakfast, but they are still healthier than any baked good at a coffeehouse. Light, fluffy and spicy, they are a wonderful, early fall treat and a great break from pumpkin muffins. This recipe is an adaptation of a recipe from Williams Sonoma, using some coconut sugar and chopped pecans. Enjoy!

Whole Wheat Buttermilk Spice Muffins (makes 9 muffins)

  • 7 tablespoons unsalted, organic butter at room temperature
  • 2/3 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans
  • 2/3 cup unbleached, organic sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 stick unsalted, organic butter, melted
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Put chopped pecans in a shallow pan and toast in the oven for 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  3. Butter 9 muffin cups of a muffin tin or use unbleached paper liners. Fill remaining cups with water.
  4. Using a standing mixer or hand beaters, beat butter and coconut sugar for 4-5 minutes or until light and fluffy. Add the egg and beat until combined.
  5. In a separate bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and nutmeg. Stir well.
  6. Add flour to butter mixture alternately with the buttermilk. Stir in vanilla and chopped pecans.
  7. Fill muffin cups 3/4 full. Bake 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.
  8. Let muffins cool 5 minutes, then remove muffins to a cooling rack and let cool another 10 minutes.
  9. Mix cinnamon and sugar in a wide bowl. Put melted butter in a separate bowl.
  10. One at a time, pick up muffins by the bottom, turn them upside down and dip the tops in the melted butter, then very quickly roll the tops in the cinnamon sugar. Put each muffin back to the rack and repeat with remaining muffins.
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Maple Pecan Muffins

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I enjoy making muffins each week for family breakfasts and snacks, and this is my first batch of fall-flavored muffins for the year. These muffins are nutty, tender and just a bit sweet. The flavors are more subtle than mixes with maple flavoring–I like that, but you can also add 1/2 teaspoon of maple flavoring if you want to oomph up the maple. One of the things I like most about making my own muffins is that I know exactly what is in them (and what isn’t). Yes to whole wheat flour, organic sugar, locally harvested nuts and real butter. No to transfats, oils, food coloring and synthetic flavoring chemicals.

As with any baking involving nuts, I definitely recommend toasting the pecans before adding them to the mix–toasting definitely adds a depth to the pecan flavor that you won’t have otherwise. We are trying to watch our sugar intake, so these don’t have a fancy streusel topping or icing, but you could certainly add that if you like! We just topped them with pecan halves and a little sprinkle of organic, brown sugar. Simple, cozy and yummy!

Maple Pecan Muffins (makes 12 muffins)

  • 1 1/2 cups pecan halves
  • 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick unsalted, organic butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup organic brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract (or maple)
  • 2 farm eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 cup Greek yogurt
  • 12 pecan halves
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Put the pecan halves in a shallow baking pan and toast them for 4-5 minutes. Remove and let cool. Chop the pecans into fairly small chunks. Set aside.
  2. Line a muffin tin with bleach-free liners or oil with a small amount of coconut oil. Set aside.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir well.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, combine butter, sugar, syrup, extract, eggs, vanilla and yogurt. Mix well.
  5. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until just combined.
    Fold in the chopped pecans.

  6. Fill the muffin tins 3/4 full and top each muffin with a pecan half and a sprinkle of brown sugar.
  7. Bake for 20-22 minutes.
  8. Cool individual muffins on a cooling rack.
  9. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week or wrap and freeze for up to three months.

Banana Pudding Refrigerator Oatmeal

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During our long, hot summers, I typically have sprouted grain bread/toast with homemade jam and a frozen fruit smoothie for breakfast. While I absolutely love steel cut oatmeal, the thought of making or eating hot oats before heading out into the humidity is just not appealing.

So I was intrigued by the experiments of a fellow blogger, Melissa at My Whole Food Life. She has been blogging all summer about no-cook refrigerator oatmeal recipes. I posted a list of links below! Like the whole chia seed thing, it took me a while to work myself up to eating cold oatmeal (yes, you can heat it in the microwave, but follow along with me here). Wouldn’t cold oatmeal be gross? Could the overnight process really soften the steel-cut oats? What would cold oatmeal taste like?

There was only one way to find out, and since I ran out of food a day short of grocery shopping day, this was the week for brave new discoveries! Armed with a very ripe banana, some steel-cut oats and some almond milk, I decided to put a southern recipe to the test with this Banana Pudding Refrigerator Oatmeal. In keeping with Melissa’s recipe proportions, I added chia seeds, vanilla bean and one chopped medjool date for sweetness. The date pieces dissolve a bit and taste like caramel. YUM!

How was it? Chock full of cold banana and creamy oats, this banana oatmeal won’t fool you into thinking it’s banana pudding, but it is clean tasting, filling and a little sweet. More like rice pudding? I am enjoying taking my jar of oatmeal from the staff refrigerator, to the great outdoors for some al fresco lunches. These late summer days are still pretty warm, so the cold oatmeal is appreciated. It is refreshing and not at all gross, like I feared. When winter comes, you can pop your jar of oats into the microwave and have a warm lunch in no time.

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Banana Pudding Refrigerator Oatmeal (makes one pint-sized serving)

  • 1/2 cup steel-cut oats (you can use rolled oats for a softer texture)
  • 1 teaspoon organic chia seeds
  • 1 large banana (or two small), peeled and slightly mashed
  • Seeds from 1 vanilla bean or 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 organic medjool date, pitted and chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups almond milk

Combine all ingredients in a bowl or in a pint sized jar. Shake well. Refrigerate overnight or up to three days.

Want some more ideas? Check out these recipes from My Whole Food Life!

Almond Butter Chocolate Overnight Oats

Apple Cinnamon Overnight Oats

Coconut Vanilla Overnight Oats

Fig and Almond Buttermilk Cake

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I’ll be the first to admit that the photos of this cake do not do it justice. I’m still working on my food photography skills and this one just didn’t work out. I’m hoping to make it again and hopefully get some better photos up. For now, you’ll have to trust me that this simple, one layer cake is freakin’ amazing. I used our buttermilk cake recipe from HERE and adapted it for a combination of figs and almonds. The resulting cake was incredibly moist, but light. The figs baked into the cake and almost melted. Wanting to try cake for breakfast? This is a good choice!

This cake used whole wheat pastry flour and coconut sugar, making it much darker in color than it would be with all purpose flour and white cane sugar. If you haven’t tried coconut sugar yet, this would be a great recipe with which to start. Coconut sugar is a minimally processed sugar that is sustainably harvested from the sap of coconut trees. Unlike cane sugar or even brown sugar, coconut sugar is a low glycemic food (glycemic index of 35) that has 36 times the amount of iron as brown sugar and 16 amino acids. It is also high in potassium, magnesium, zinc, vitamin B1, B2, B3 and B6. It is considered safe to use for diabetics and can be used as a replacement for cane sugar in 1:1 ratio. Because it is very dark in color, your baking will also take on a rich, dark brown color, so keep that in mind. I don’t particularly care, but if you are baking a white cake, you’ll want to know that in advance.

I dare you to open a bag of coconut sugar, take a deep inhale, and NOT fall in love. I. Dare. You.

Enjoy the figs of late summer! I hope to make this cake a few more times before fig season is officially over. And maybe–well probably–have it for breakfast 🙂

Fig and Almond Buttermilk Cake (makes one 9″ round cake)

  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 stick unsalted, organic butter, softened
  • 1 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 large farm egg
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 pint fresh, organic figs, trimmed and cut in half lengthwise
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Grease and flour a 9″ round cake pan. Set aside.
  3. In a small mixing bowl, blend the first four ingredients. Set aside.
  4. In the bowl of a mixer, combine the softened butter and the sugar and beat well for about 2 minutes.
  5. Add the vanilla, almond extract and egg to the butter mixture and beat until blended.
  6. With the mixer on low, alternately add the flour and buttermilk, starting and ending with the flour. Mix until just blended.
  7. Add the batter to the pan, spreading evenly. Top with the fig halves and almond slices.
  8. Bake for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick poked in the center comes out clean.
  9. Cool cake in the pan for 10 minutes, then remove cake to a cooling rack to cool completely.
  10. Serve slightly warm.

Almond Butter Stuffed Banana Muffins

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While working on the post for preserving nuts (see here), I made a lot of chocolate almond butter. I mean, really, a LOT. So I started looking for creative ways to use some of it in recipes (stuffed pancakes, anyone?). Earlier in the summer, we posted a recipe for Whole Wheat Linzer Muffins (almond muffins stuffed with raspberry jam) and that got me thinking–would using almond butter as stuffing work? Turns out, the answer is a delicious YES!

These muffins are satisfying and filling. I used a regular banana muffin recipe and filled the muffin cups with a tablespoon of batter. I topped that bit of batter with a small ball of chocolate almond butter, then filled the muffin cups the rest of the way. Very easy and, if you have a small helper with you, they could make the little balls of almond butter for you and get some real world application for their budding play dough skills!

Almond Butter Stuffed Banana Muffins (makes 12 muffins)

  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour (or all-purpose)
  • 3/4 cup organic coconut sugar (or organic cane sugar)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 very ripe bananas, peeled and mashed
  • 1 large farm egg
  • 1/3 cup butter, melted and cooled
  • 1/2 cup chocolate almond butter
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Line the cups of a muffin pan with paper liners or oil. Set aside.
  3. Make 12-1″ balls from the almond butter and set aside.
  4. In a small mixing bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda. Mix well.
  5. In a larger bowl, wisk together the bananas, sugar, egg and butter. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, fold in the dry ingredients and mix just until all the flour is moistened.
  6. Drop a tablespoon or so of batter into each muffin cup. Place one ball of almond butter into each muffin cup.
  7. Fill the cups with batter and bake for 15-18 minutes. Check for doneness using a toothpick. Tops should be browned and the toothpick should come out clean.
  8. Let cool in muffin cups for 10 minutes. Remove muffins to a cooling rack and let cool completely.
  9. Muffins can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week or frozen in individual freezer bags for up to 6 months.

Berry Buttermilk Cake

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Cake for breakfast. You’re welcome.

The story of making this cake begins with a mystery.

This cake is easy, light and delicious. My colleague Terra brought a lovely version of this cake to work and was nice enough to share the recipe. When I went to make it, however, I noticed that all…ALL…of my cake pans had disappeared. Poof! Gone! Now, if you were to see my small house, you would understand that there are only so many places to hide things (“so many” being four). They are just flat-out gone. I would blame the cat, but his lack of opposable thumbs rules him out. So, I relied instead on my Kings Pottery baking dish, which is apparently not 9″ as noted in the recipe. But we all make do, right?

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With the still-unsolved mystery on my mind, I adjusted this recipe to my kitchen, using whole wheat pastry flour, organic, unbleached sugar and the blackberries and raspberries I had from our Produce Box. The end result is a bit more “rustic” and browner than the original, but we all liked it very much. I tried making an artful display of berries on top, but as you can see from the photo, the batter rises up and swallows the berries anyway, so if you are not feeling “artful”, that is okay. This would be a terrific summer dessert on those nights that you serve a rich meal and just want something light. It would also be a wonderful coffee cake for breakfast or brunch.

Yes, cake for breakfast. Yum.

If you happen to find three random cake pans wandering around, send them home, please. They are missed. I still suspect the cat.

Berry Buttermilk Cake (makes one 9″ cake)

  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup organic, unbleached cane sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Zest of one lemon
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 pint fresh, pesticide free berries
  • 1 tablespoon turbinado or other course sugar
  1. Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Butter and flour a 9″ cake pan (or the closest you can find!)
  3. In a small mixing bowl, blend the first four ingredients. Set aside.
  4. In the bowl of a mixer, combine butter and sugar and beat well, until the butter is light and fluffy.
  5. Add the vanilla and lemon zest and egg to the butter and mix until blended.
  6. With the mixer on low, alternately add the flour and buttermilk, starting and ending with the flour. Mix until just blended.
  7. Add the batter to the pie pan, spreading evenly. Top with the berries and the remaining sugar.
  8. Bake 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick poked in the center comes out clean.
  9. Cool in the pan 10 minutes, then turn out onto a cooling rack and cool for 15 minutes more.
  10. Serve warm.

Raspberry Vanilla Chia Pudding

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I am “of a generation” that grew up realizing Christmas was just around the corner when that magical info-mercial took to the television airwaves. Cha-cha-cha-Chia! Yes, Chia-pets, those crazy terra cotta animal head shapes that, once planted with chia seeds, sprouted hair-like grass. Available only during the holidays, so that you could be “that guy” who brought a grassy head to the office Secret Santa party. The 70s were a strange and bewildering time. Maybe it was the drugs. Or the fringe. It never occurred to us to eat those seeds, but now those same ancient seeds are the hottest superfood around.

I have to be honest with you. I was pretty skeptical about chia seeds. Not their nutritional value–they are definitely in the Super Food category, with tons of fiber, protein and omega-3s. As a matter of fact, they have the highest level of omega-3 fatty acids of any known plant source. These little seeds are nutritional powerhouses, I tell you.

So it wasn’t their content that bothered me. I just couldn’t get past their…well…texture. Chia seeds have the ability to soak up 10 times their weight in liquid, forming a bulky gel. This makes them a terrific natural thickener and their high fiber content keeps you full a long time. But, like tapioca, they also have a definite texture, and I wasn’t sure I could get beyond that. But this journey is all about learning, right? So we got ourselves some pesticide-free chia seeds and dove into the realm of all things chia, starting with what looked like the slimiest of all recipes–chia puddings.

Our first attempt at a chia pudding was okay, but not great–we made a mocha pudding with soy milk, raw cacao, some powdered coffee and a bit of maple syrup. Tom’s reaction? It didn’t have enough chocolate flavor, but he thought he might be able to get used to it after having it a few more times. Hmmmm. Not the enthusiastic endorsement I like to have! If I’m going to post a recipe, it has to be great, not so-so.

So I tried again with some fresh raspberries from the farmers market and some vanilla flavored yogurt and soy milk. The result? A hit! This no-cook pudding was creamy, rich with vanilla flavor and studded with lovely, tart raspberries. A keeper, for sure! Yes, the texture has a tapioca pudding-like thing going on, but it isn’t bad, and the seeds are actually smaller than blackberry seeds, so they aren’t SO noticeable.

One of the beauties of this recipe is that you mix everything together the night before and can take it to work for lunch. Or have it for a quick breakfast on the run! This lovely pudding was my lunch for the day and I was surprisingly full all afternoon. While it is genuinely no-cook, it does take time (several hours) for the chia seeds to do their thing, so you do need to plan a bit ahead.

I used a vanilla-flavored yogurt for our pudding because that is what we had on hand, but you could use plain Greek yogurt and add vanilla bean paste. Or you could go vegan and just use a vegan milk, leaving the yogurt out altogether. The yogurt did have some sugar in it, so our version was not sugar-free, but you can adjust that as you like.

What about you? Do you make chia recipes? What works best for you?

Raspberry Vanilla Chia Pudding (makes 2 half-cup dessert servings or one meal-sized serving)

  • 2 ounces vanilla flavored Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup soy milk (any milk will work here)
  • 1 heaping tablespoon pesticide-free chia seeds
  • 6-8 fresh raspberries, washed
  1. Combine all ingredients except berries in a small bowl and blend with a whisk until smooth.
  2. Carefully stir in berries.
  3. Cover and refrigerate 4 hours or overnight.
  4. Stir well before eating.

Mango Lassi Ice Pops

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Hello, Bollywood? You need to roll out the red carpet for these Mango Lassi Ice Pops. They are big stars, I tell you.

Have you ever had a mango lassi? Mango lassi is an incredibly refreshing Indian beverage, very similar to an American milk shake or smoothie, but without the heavy dairy fat and sugar. When Ellie was little, the owner of a local Indian restaurant we frequented usually offered her a mango lassi. She could never finish it, so I finished them for her (you know, a mother’s sacrifices are endless). Mango lassis use fresh mango, yogurt and cardamom, resulting in a sweet and spicy combination that is delicious, especially in the heat of summer. Why they aren’t a popular drink in North Carolina–where it gets about as hot as India–is beyond me.

These Mango Lassi Ice Pops are cool, creamy and delicious. They are also gluten-free and sugar free. Spiced with cardamom, they are just a teensy bit spicy in that lovely floral way that cardamom infuses everything. You can leave the cardamom out, but I encourage you to give it a try–it really makes something good, extraordinary.

A word about mango: I use frozen organic mango from Trader Joes, but you could also use fresh mango if you have ripe mangoes available. If you have an Indian grocery nearby, buy your mangoes there–they will have a greater variety of mangoes than the typical American grocery store.

This recipe makes about 1/2 cup more than you need for the ice pops, so the chef gets a treat at the end 🙂

I am listing this recipe under “breakfast as well because if you serve what comes from the blender, it would be a nice lassi smoothie!

Mango Lassi Ice Pops (makes 10, 3 ounce ice pops)
Each ice pop has 51 calories and .9 grams of fat and 2.6 grams of protein

* 4 cups peeled and chopped ripe mango or organic frozen mango
* 6 ounces organic Greek yogurt
* 2 cups organic almond milk or soy milk
* 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
* 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1. Put all ingredients in a good quality blender (I use my trusty Vitamix). Blend until smooth.
2. Fill your ice pop mold and freeze several hours or overnight.
3. Unmold ice pops and enjoy!

Simple Strawberry Jam

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I am not a fruit jelly person.

Fruit jellies are those lovely, clear, sparkling creations prized for their lack of seeds or fruit pulp. They take time, patience and (to me) they are a bit fussy. Give me a hearty, rustic jam with chunks of tender fruit to spread all over my morning toast any day. Homemade jam reminds me of sticky, jam kisses from your children. And lazy, summer mornings. And one of my favorite children’s books, Jamberry by Bruce Degan.

By next week, we will have blueberries…

One berry, two berry, pick me a blueberry
Hatberry, shoeberry, in my canoeberry

But right now, we have strawberries…

Three berry
Four berry
Hayberry
Strawberry
Finger and pawberry
My berry, your berry

So this weekend, I made strawberry jam, thick with pieces of strawberry and absolutely, berry delicious. This recipe is a slight derivation from a recipe in Sherry Brooks Vinton’s book Put ‘Em Up. Just slight though. I use a stick blender to really mash up the berries and I also add 1 tablespoon of organic, unsalted butter to the cooking berries. I seem to have a problem with strawberries producing a lot of foam and the butter is a Ball recipe suggestion for reducing foam (it works!).

And if I haven’t said it enough, the Put ‘Em Up canning/food preservation book is really the best one I have. It is the only one that is thoroughly sticky, splattered, dog-eared and well-loved. For the record, I get nothing for saying that, just the satisfaction of sharing with you something I appreciate.

Got strawberries? Go make this jam!

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Strawberry Jam (makes 6-7 half pints)

  • 8 cups of organic strawberries, rinsed and hulled (tops taken off)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted, organic butter
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons Pomona’s Universal Pectin
  • 2 teaspoons calcium water (included in the Pomona’s packet)
  1. Cut the cleaned and hulled berries into quarters (or into halves if the are small). Put cut berries into a non-reactive stock pot.
  2. Mash the berries with a potato masher, then blend together with a stick blender for about 1 minute.
  3. Mix the sugar and pectin together in a bowl.
  4. Fill your canning pot with water and add the rack and your jars. Heat over high heat and bring to a rolling boil. Put lids in a bowl and set aside.
  5. While you wait for the canning pot to heat, bring the berries and the butter to a boil over medium high heat, and stir to make sure they don’t burn.
  6. Stir in the calcium water and lemon juice. Then, add the sugar and pectin mixture, stirring to prevent lumps.
  7. Return the berry mixture to a boil, heating through. The mixture should be thick and coat the back of a spoon. Remove pot from the heat and let sit for 5 minutes. Skim off any foam.
  8. Turn the heat off of the canning pot. Remove hot jars from the canning pot CAREFULLY and empty the hot water inside the jars back into the canning pot. Put some of the hot water in the bowl with the jar lids. You want to cover them in the very hot water.
  9. Fill the hot jars with the hot berries, leaving 1/4″ of headspace. We use our trusty blue canning funnel. Use a spatula or the gadget that comes with your canning kit to remove any excess air in the jars.
  10. Wipe jar rims with a clean paper towel, take the lids from the hot water and top each jar with a lid. Screw on bands just to finger tightness (don’t over tighten).
  11. Add the jars back to the canning pot, add the cover, and bring water to a boil for 10 minutes.
  12. Cut off the heat, remove the pot lid and let jars sit for 5 minutes.
  13. Remove jars from the canning pot and do not tilt them! I use a clean tea towel to dab excess water off the jars, but keep them straight.
  14. Let the jars sit I disturbed for 24 hours. Check seals and store all sealed jars in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year.

Note: If you have any extra jam that doesn’t quite fill a jar, you can ladle it into a jar or cup and refrigerate it for up to 3 weeks!

This is the basic technique that applies to all berry jam making. The proportion of acid and pectin may change, but if you can do this, you will be able to can almost anything! Ready? Give it a go!

Raspberry, jazzberry, razzamatazzberry,
Berry land, merryland, jamming in berryland

Tomato, Avocado, Bacon, Lettuce and Egg (TABLE) Sandwiches

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The weather has finally turned toward summer, and this week I ramped up my running schedule. I love getting out on the greenways, but a side effect of more exercise is that I am STARVING. Not just a little peckish–I am “I could rip someone’s head off” hungry. Trying not to eat like a linebacker, though, ’cause if I do, I won’t be running anywhere. This version of a spring BLT sandwich (a TABLE sandwich) is more satisfying than the regular variety without being bad for me (like the 5 Guys burger I was contemplating). This is definitely a thick, Dagwood-style sandwich and it makes a meal on its own.

Why TABLE? Well, TABLE sounded like a better acronym for the ingredients than BLEAT, right? All of these ingredients except the avocado came from our local farmer’s market and were locally produced–even the whole grain, multigrain bread from La Farm.

Speaking of bread, if you are watching your carbs, this sandwich could also be served open-faced, if you wanted to eliminate one slice of bread (when the bread is fresh and truly whole, multigrain, I’m up for both slices!).

For supper, I sautéed some fresh asparagus in about 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat until they were just tender, and served that with our sandwiches. The sandwiches were so filling on their own, we didn’t need an extra vegetable, but it was delicious all the same. Yum!

Spring TABLE Sandwich (makes one sandwich)
One sandwich has 560 calories and 23 grams of protein. It is a meal by itself!

  • 2 slices whole, multigrain bread (La Farm)
  • 1/4 organic avocado
  • 1 slice local raw cheddar
  • 1 organic Roma tomato
  • 1 leaf organic lettuce
  • 2 slices cooked local bacon
  • 1 farm egg
  • 1 teaspoon organic mayonnaise
  1. Toast the bread slices and set aside.
  2. Mash the avocado with a fork until it is guacamole texture. Set aside.
  3. Slice the tomato and set aside.
  4. In a small nonstick pan, cook the egg to your desired done-ness. I like lightly fried with a slightly runny yolk.
  5. Assemble your sandwich by spreading the avocado on one slice of bread. Top with cheese, bacon, tomato, egg and lettuce.
  6. Spread mayonnaise on the remaining slice of bread and put that slice, mayo side down, on your sandwich.
  7. Dig in!

 

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