Berry Buttermilk Cake

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Cake for breakfast. You’re welcome.

The story of making this cake begins with a mystery.

This cake is easy, light and delicious. My colleague Terra brought a lovely version of this cake to work and was nice enough to share the recipe. When I went to make it, however, I noticed that all…ALL…of my cake pans had disappeared. Poof! Gone! Now, if you were to see my small house, you would understand that there are only so many places to hide things (“so many” being four). They are just flat-out gone. I would blame the cat, but his lack of opposable thumbs rules him out. So, I relied instead on my Kings Pottery baking dish, which is apparently not 9″ as noted in the recipe. But we all make do, right?

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With the still-unsolved mystery on my mind, I adjusted this recipe to my kitchen, using whole wheat pastry flour, organic, unbleached sugar and the blackberries and raspberries I had from our Produce Box. The end result is a bit more “rustic” and browner than the original, but we all liked it very much. I tried making an artful display of berries on top, but as you can see from the photo, the batter rises up and swallows the berries anyway, so if you are not feeling “artful”, that is okay. This would be a terrific summer dessert on those nights that you serve a rich meal and just want something light. It would also be a wonderful coffee cake for breakfast or brunch.

Yes, cake for breakfast. Yum.

If you happen to find three random cake pans wandering around, send them home, please. They are missed. I still suspect the cat.

Berry Buttermilk Cake (makes one 9″ cake)

  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup organic, unbleached cane sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Zest of one lemon
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 pint fresh, pesticide free berries
  • 1 tablespoon turbinado or other course sugar
  1. Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Butter and flour a 9″ cake pan (or the closest you can find!)
  3. In a small mixing bowl, blend the first four ingredients. Set aside.
  4. In the bowl of a mixer, combine butter and sugar and beat well, until the butter is light and fluffy.
  5. Add the vanilla and lemon zest and egg to the butter and mix until blended.
  6. With the mixer on low, alternately add the flour and buttermilk, starting and ending with the flour. Mix until just blended.
  7. Add the batter to the pie pan, spreading evenly. Top with the berries and the remaining sugar.
  8. Bake 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick poked in the center comes out clean.
  9. Cool in the pan 10 minutes, then turn out onto a cooling rack and cool for 15 minutes more.
  10. Serve warm.

Mixed Berry Ice Pops

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I can’t tell you how much fun we have had making our own ice pops this summer! This mixed berry version is definitely my favorite so far. The berries are nice and tart–very refreshing on a hot day. The yogurt and almond milk mellow out the tartness and keep the ice pops just a bit creamy. We used a mix of blackberries, blueberries, raspberries and cherries since that is what we have at the markets now. You can use whatever is available to you locally or buy a bag of frozen berries. Maybe I’ll sneak some of these into the deep freeze for a winter treat 🙂

Mixed Berry Ice Pops (makes 10, 3 ounce ice pops)

  • 4 cups fresh berries (preferably pesticide-free)
  • 4 ounces vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups organic almond milk
  1. Put all ingredients into a Vitamix or good quality blender. Blend until smooth.
  2. Pour into ice pop molds.
  3. Add sticks, if needed, and freeze 4 hours or overnight.

Summer Corn and Black Bean Salad

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When summer starts blazing with heat and humidity, I usually lose my desire to cook anything complicated. I love cold vegetable salads in the summer–their fresh flavors add a a lot to grilled foods and if you add some protein (like sustainably caught tuna), you can turn a side dish into an entrĂ©e in a snap!

I found a corn salad recipe on Pinterest recently, and it looked promising. The photos were artful and lovely and the description sounded very tasty. I made it according to the directions, and not only was it not tasty, it didn’t look anything like the photo. Grrr. This made me wonder if anyone had actually made the recipe or if they were just re-pinning a bit of food porn. Pinterest is weird like that. Also, what is up with all the processed food recipes calling themselves “Amish” recipes? Pretty sure Amish people don’t eat cheese spread and Nutella. Just sayin’.

Once I found myself with a sub-par recipe, I re-assessed the situation, and came up with a plan to fix the salad. This is what I ended up with. The photo may not be beautiful, but the flavors are, and I vouch for the recipe because I actually did make it and eat it myself!

To update you, I finished my first 10K race, the Athleta Esprit de She, in the blazing heat and had such a great time, even if my time wasn’t great. It was wonderful to run with a group of women–what terrific, positive energy! I met some wonderful people, including a lovely lady named Pam, who encouraged me to run the Disney races. At 59, she has been running for 3 years, and has finished 8 half marathons with her daughter. Her blog, We Run Disney, is HERE if you want to check it out! As I close in on 50, I have been really giving a lot of thought to what I want to accomplish before that milestone. Pam was so friendly and encouraging, that I emailed her for more info. and now, I have set a new goal–Tom and I are going to run the Disney Princess Half Marathon in February 2014! Yes, yes, you wonder how Tom qualifies as a “princess”. Turns out, princes can run with a qualifying princess, so now our decision is what kind of matching costumes to wear (Tom would vote for “no costume,” but what fun is that?). And at some point soon, we will start training. Fun!

Salads like this will help us train in the sweltering months ahead! You can make this full recipe or divide everything in half for a smaller amount. Either way, it’s all good!

Summer Corn and Black Bean Salad (makes about 8 servings)

  • 4 ears of organic corn
  • 2 cans organic black beans
  • 1 pint organic cherry tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup chopped chili peppers (I used 1/2 can of roasted Hatch New Mexican peppers)
  • 1 avocado
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • Juice of one lime
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  1. Cook corn in your preferred method. I leave the cobs wrapped in the husks, cut the bottom inch off and microwave the cobs two at a time for 3 minutes. Let the cobs cool a bit, then grab the tops of the husk and silk and push the cob out the bottom. You should end up with one naked cob and a handful of husk and silk.
  2. Using a sharp knife or a scraper, remove the corn kernels from the cobs and put in a bowl.
  3. Drain and rinse the black beans and add to the bowl.
  4. Wash and halve the tomatoes. Add to the bowl.
  5. Whisk together the olive oil, lime juice, salt, pepper and garlic powder. Pour over the vegetables and mix well.
  6. Cut up the avocado (or mash like guacamole) and fold into the vegetable mixture.
  7. Cover and refrigerate for at least an hour.
  8. Serve chilled.

Pasta with Shrimp, Green Beans, and Tomato

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Oh, this pasta.

So good I could have licked the bowl (and maybe I did). Chock full of summer goodness and garlicky basil pesto. I love Julia Child, but I have to say, Italians can rock out some fresh produce. And seafood. Ummm…Wait, can I have pasta for dessert?

This dish was supposed to be my supper the night before my first 10K, however due to an emergency at work, that didn’t happen. Instead, it became my post-race night supper. And it was very delicious, light, but satisfying. If you don’t like shrimp, you could use some pulled chicken instead. The green beans and tomatoes came in our Produce Box this week!

Pasta with Shrimp, Green Beans and Tomato (makes 6 servings)

  • 1 lb. pasta (we used organic casarecce pasta)
  • 1lb. shrimp, peeled
  • 1/2 lb. fresh green beans, washed, trimmed and cut into bite size pieces
  • 1/2 pint fresh cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 cup basil pesto (or more, if you like)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    1. Fill a stock pot with water and bring to a rolling boil.
    2. When pasta water is boiling, add several tablespoons of kosher salt to the pot.
    3. In a medium sauté pan, heat the olive oil at medium heat. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute.
    4. Add the pasta and beans to the boiling water. Cook according to pasta directions.
    5. Add the shrimp to the sautĂ© pan. Cook until barely pink. Then, add the tomatoes and continue cooking until shrimp are completely pink and opaque (this should be about 3 minutes). Don’t over cook!
    6. Drain the pasta and green beans and add pasta mix to a large serving bowl. Add the shrimp and tomatoes to the bowl. Add the Parmesan cheese and pesto and mix together well.
    7. Serve immediately.
  • Healthy, Baked Eggplant Parmesan

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    I think I made it all the way to adulthood with an intense dislike for eggplant. To me it was a bitter, slimy, vegetable that was typically served fried and greasy in some version of eggplant Parmesan. I’m not sure when my eggplant revelation came about, but eggplant is now one of my favorite summer vegetables. I love it grilled, roasted with garlic and especially baked in this wonderful healthy re-make of eggplant Parmesan.

    This recipe makes the most of fresh, local eggplant, tomato and basil. We have local mozzarella thanks to Hillsborough Cheese Company, so only the Parmesan Reggiano, olive oil and salt were store-bought. We used some of our yummy Roasted Tomato Sauce, which is my favorite discovery from last summer (well, maybe it’s a tie with Mae Farm Bacon Onion Marmalade).

    Think of this recipe as lasagna with eggplant replacing the noodles. This is no greasy, fried, chain restaurant dish–it is flavorful, nourishing and rich in antioxidants and fiber. And your house will smell A-MAZ-ING while it is baking. Tom commented several times that it is hard to believe this is a meatless dish. If you substitute vegan cheese, it would be a completely vegan dish. Like it’s lasagna cousin, this freezes and reheats well, making super tasty leftovers. Healthy, local and delicious. Win-win-win. Yum-yum-yum!

    Healthy, Baked Eggplant Parmesan (makes 6 servings)

    • 3 medium eggplant (we used several baby eggplant and one medium)
    • Kosher salt
    • Olive oil
    • 1 quart Roasted Tomato Sauce (or 1 jar from the store)
    • 2 c. mozzarella cheese, grated (you can use part-skim to reduce the fat)
    • 1 c. Parmesan cheese, grated
    • 1 c. loosely packed basil leaves, chopped
    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
    3. Wash eggplant and slice into 1/4″ or so slices. Put slices on the baking sheet and brush with olive oil. Sprinkle lightly with salt.
    4. Roast eggplant slices for about 12 minutes–until they are fork tender.
    5. Spread a thin layer of tomato sauce on the bottom of a 9 x 13 baking dish. Add one layer of the eggplant. Top with 1/3 of the tomato sauce, a sprinkling of basil leaves, 1/3 of the mozzarella and 1/3 of the Parmesan. Repeat layers two more times, ending with cheese on top.
    6. Bake in oven for about 40 minutes, until hot and bubbly and golden brown on top.
    7. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving.

    Week 26 Budget and Menu

    It is officially hot here in North Carolina. Summer came in with the customary heat and humidity that defines much of the South. I don’t care though, I love summer. Love it, love it, love it. We’re moving our cooking outdoors and to the fridge this week, with more grilling and chilling and less oven cookery.

    Crazily, I signed up to run my first real 10K tonight,when the temperature will be a muggy 90 degrees. Will I make it? Will a thunderstorm wash me away? And what was I thinking??? Stay tuned to find out if I gas out or actually cross the finish line. Really, it could go either way at this point.

    Have your farmer’s markets gone berserk with produce? Our farmer’s markets are bursting with goodness right now and I am planning to carve out time next week for some full-on canning and freezing. Can’t wait!

    Our budget this week is horrible!!! Whaaaat??? $145.54 is way above our usual spending. I am finding that food prices–even at Trader Joes–are increasing quite a lot. The Ezekiel bread I love to eat for breakfast has gone from $3.99 a loaf to almost $5.00. Milk, cheese, yogurt have all increased as well. We are stocking up a bit on organic beans to use in salads and such, but still. Oi! So, chalk this week up to a menu win, but a budget fail! With July 4th on the horizon, I’m not sure next week will be much better.

    Budget [$145.54]

    The Produce Box (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, tomatoes, sweet corn, bell peppers, eggplant, white potatoes, smoked cheddar): $34.60

    Trader Joes (frozen fruit, almond milk, Ezekiel bread, organic canned beans, organic lemon, canned tuna, guacamole, shredded pepper jack cheese, taco seasoning, organic chicken, buttermilk, organic corn chips, organic lime, yogurt, raw almonds, shredded cheese): $62.34

    Locals Seafood (shrimp, fresh yellow fin tuna): $32.60

    Black Hoof Farm (organic ground beef): $6.00

    The Mitchell Family Pantry (jam, tomato salsa, pickled jalapenos, frozen peppers): $12.00

    Menu

    Wednesday–Out, pre-race dinner
    Thursday–Tuna white bean salad–10k race and softball night!!!
    Friday–Shrimp and string bean pesto pasta
    Saturday–Softball team party (healthy taco salad)
    Sunday–Grilled local hamburgers w/smoked cheddar, summer corn salad, eggplant
    Monday–Grilled soy tuna steak kabobs, roasted potatoes, eggplant
    Tuesday–Leftover buffet

    Raspberry Vanilla Chia Pudding

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    I am “of a generation” that grew up realizing Christmas was just around the corner when that magical info-mercial took to the television airwaves. Cha-cha-cha-Chia! Yes, Chia-pets, those crazy terra cotta animal head shapes that, once planted with chia seeds, sprouted hair-like grass. Available only during the holidays, so that you could be “that guy” who brought a grassy head to the office Secret Santa party. The 70s were a strange and bewildering time. Maybe it was the drugs. Or the fringe. It never occurred to us to eat those seeds, but now those same ancient seeds are the hottest superfood around.

    I have to be honest with you. I was pretty skeptical about chia seeds. Not their nutritional value–they are definitely in the Super Food category, with tons of fiber, protein and omega-3s. As a matter of fact, they have the highest level of omega-3 fatty acids of any known plant source. These little seeds are nutritional powerhouses, I tell you.

    So it wasn’t their content that bothered me. I just couldn’t get past their…well…texture. Chia seeds have the ability to soak up 10 times their weight in liquid, forming a bulky gel. This makes them a terrific natural thickener and their high fiber content keeps you full a long time. But, like tapioca, they also have a definite texture, and I wasn’t sure I could get beyond that. But this journey is all about learning, right? So we got ourselves some pesticide-free chia seeds and dove into the realm of all things chia, starting with what looked like the slimiest of all recipes–chia puddings.

    Our first attempt at a chia pudding was okay, but not great–we made a mocha pudding with soy milk, raw cacao, some powdered coffee and a bit of maple syrup. Tom’s reaction? It didn’t have enough chocolate flavor, but he thought he might be able to get used to it after having it a few more times. Hmmmm. Not the enthusiastic endorsement I like to have! If I’m going to post a recipe, it has to be great, not so-so.

    So I tried again with some fresh raspberries from the farmers market and some vanilla flavored yogurt and soy milk. The result? A hit! This no-cook pudding was creamy, rich with vanilla flavor and studded with lovely, tart raspberries. A keeper, for sure! Yes, the texture has a tapioca pudding-like thing going on, but it isn’t bad, and the seeds are actually smaller than blackberry seeds, so they aren’t SO noticeable.

    One of the beauties of this recipe is that you mix everything together the night before and can take it to work for lunch. Or have it for a quick breakfast on the run! This lovely pudding was my lunch for the day and I was surprisingly full all afternoon. While it is genuinely no-cook, it does take time (several hours) for the chia seeds to do their thing, so you do need to plan a bit ahead.

    I used a vanilla-flavored yogurt for our pudding because that is what we had on hand, but you could use plain Greek yogurt and add vanilla bean paste. Or you could go vegan and just use a vegan milk, leaving the yogurt out altogether. The yogurt did have some sugar in it, so our version was not sugar-free, but you can adjust that as you like.

    What about you? Do you make chia recipes? What works best for you?

    Raspberry Vanilla Chia Pudding (makes 2 half-cup dessert servings or one meal-sized serving)

    • 2 ounces vanilla flavored Greek yogurt
    • 1/2 cup soy milk (any milk will work here)
    • 1 heaping tablespoon pesticide-free chia seeds
    • 6-8 fresh raspberries, washed
    1. Combine all ingredients except berries in a small bowl and blend with a whisk until smooth.
    2. Carefully stir in berries.
    3. Cover and refrigerate 4 hours or overnight.
    4. Stir well before eating.

    Fish with Fennel and Tomato

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    This is an oldie, but a goodie! Just made this again this weekend and was reminded of how wonderful I few simple ingredients can be!

    Someday, I am going to retire and move to Italy. In my mind, that retirement includes doing yoga on the sunny balcony of an apartment in Cinque Terre, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. And shopping in the weekly market to buy fresh cheese and produce and local olives, capers, tomatoes and fish. And socializing with the other local old people who gather at the market. That image often helps me get through the most stressful workdays and puts a smile on my face in the most tiresome meetings. It’s my mental happy place.

    This recipe may become the tangible representation of my idyllic dream. A culinary happy place. With some fresh fish from Locals Seafood, local fennel, local tomatoes we froze whole over the summer and parsley and thyme from our garden, this is a quick, summertime winner. If you want to grill your fish, you could do that and make the sauce in a separate dish–easy!

    Fish with Tomato and Fennel (4 servings)

    • 4 fish fillets (we used local Spanish Mackerel)
    • 1/4 cup high quality olive oil
    • 1 bulb fennel, trimmed and chopped
    • 1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves
    • 2 cloves organic garlic, peeled and minced
    • 6 plum tomatoes, roughly chopped
    • 1/2 cup unpitted olives (optional)
    • 1/4 cup capers, rinsed (optional)
    • 1/2 cup chopped Italian, flat leaf parsley
    • Kosher or sea salt and pepper to taste
    1. Heat the olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat. Add the fennel and cook without browning until it is soft (about 15 minutes). Season to taste with salt and pepper.
    2. Add the thyme and garlic and cook an additional 1 minute. Stir well.
    3. Add the chopped tomatoes, olives and capers to the pan. Raise the heat a bit and cook until the mixture is thick, but not dry (about 15 minutes depending on how much liquid your tomatoes hold). Reserve and keep warm.
    4. Cook fish to your preference (I pan seared ours, but grilling would be great also).
    5. Plate the fish and top with the tomato and fennel sauce. Garnish with parsley.
    6. Pour yourself a glass of wine, inhale the delicious aroma and dream…

    Fresh Drum Fish with Cherry Tomatoes

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    We have the most amazing Sun Gold cherry tomatoes this week from Wild Onion Organic Farm. They are by far the best we have had all summer–soooo full of flavor! In fact, they are my snack at work because I cannot stop eating them.

    I found some lovely, fresh Red Drum fillets from Locals Seafood on Wednesday and made this Italian dish last night. Red Drum is a local fish that has a very mild flavor–perfect with our tart sun gold tomatoes! This dish is perfect for summer–quick, easy and light. We thought it was pretty spectacular, but make this only if you have fresh cherry tomatoes. If you don’t have good tomatoes, make something else because the flavor of the dish really depends on them. We served this with local potatoes and green beans that we boiled together and tossed with the final cubes of last summer’s basil pesto. Locavore summer magic! Enjoy!

    Fish with Cherry Tomatoes (serves 2)

    • 2 fish fillets (any mild fish would be good here), preferably skin on
    • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and whole
    • 3-4 tbsp. olive oil
    • Kosher or sea salt and pepper
    • 1/2 cup white wine
    • 1pint good quality cherry tomatoes, washed and cut in half
    • 1 bunch flat leaf parsley
    1. Add olive oil to a saute pan that is big enough to handle the fish. Heat to medium low.
    2. Add the whole garlic cloves and saute for about 3 minutes, just to infuse the olive oil. Remove cloves.
    3. Turn heat up to medium high. Sprinkle salt and pepper on fish fillets.
    4. Add fillets to the oil and cover pan. Cook for about 2-3 minutes. Do not turn the fish.
    5. Remove lid and add the white wine and tomatoes. Cover and cook until the fish is flaky and cooked through (unless you are using a very thick fish like tuna, this will probably be another 2-3 minutes).
    6. Remove from heat, add chopped parsley and serve.

    Penalizing Healthy Eating at Camp

    If you have followed our blog for a while, you know that along our journey we have come across true food heroes and we have come across folks who talk about health, but who really don’t put that into practice. We’ve been through school fundraisers that directly contradict county policy about unhealthy foods and pleas to parents to make healthy post-game snacks. It is frustrating when the issue of childhood obesity and poor health outcomes for the next generation are everywhere, yet in some cases we keep making the same stupid mistakes over and over. I still can’t figure out if this is ignorance, laziness or apathy.

    Summer camps are another area where we talk the talk of health, but where most of the time snacks and meals are pretty atrocious. Here is an article originally published on the Huffington Post by First Bites Founder Caron Gremont regarding how we punish or penalize families who want healthier choices.

    What do you think about this?

    Obesity Is Officially a Disease, So Why Was My Child Diagnosed as a ‘Healthy Eater’?

    by Caron Gremont, http://www.firstbites.org

    Today, the American Medical Association officially diagnosed obesity as a disease. So why is my daughter’s summer camp sending her to the nurse for being a “healthy eater”?

    Next week, my 5-year-old daughter starts summer camp for the first time. As I sat in the parent orientation meeting, the camp director laid out the great activities she will do and reviewed some new data from the American Camp Association (ACA) on the benefits of camp for children. According to the ACA website, “building blocks of self-esteem are belonging, learning, and contributing. Camps offer unique opportunities for children to succeed in these three vital areas.”

    It all sounded fantastic — until I saw the snack menu.

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    At 3:15 p.m. every day, the camp provides a “camp snack” to all the children (ages range from 5- to 15-years-old). Considering the children swim twice a day and have outdoor play as well as dance and sports almost daily, they need a snack that provides them with energy and carries them from lunch to dinner.

    So what is the camp offering?

    A daily choice of Oreos, Chips Ahoy, Nilla wafers, Cheese Curls, and potato chips. It’s not like the camp has never heard of fruit; they are serving watermelon or grapes once a week. Could they possibly think that these artificial, highly-sweetened, and highly-processed foods are filling, nutritious, and appropriate to serve growing children?

    I talked to the head counselor, and explained that we try to eat “real food” that is both satisfying and nourishing, and I was worried about both the poor quality of the “food” they were serving as well as how little satisfaction it would actually provide. She sent me to the woman in charge of the snacks, who was very kind and sent me to the head of the camp, who was also understanding and sent me to camp nurse. The nurse said I could send in whatever snacks I wanted for my daughter. She would store them in her office, and my daughter could come and get them every afternoon. And my friend, whose daughter must follow a gluten-free diet, told me our children could come together to get their daily snacks!

    And then it hit me: eating “healthy” snacks is being treated like a disease. The camp was very happy to accommodate our “special” needs and reassured me that with all the allergies today, our daughter wouldn’t be the only one eating a “special” diet.

    My daughter doesn’t think her diet is “special.” To her, it’s normal. She eats a wide variety of fruits and vegetables throughout the day. She loves to snack on carrots, raw peppers and hummus, and no one has told her that this is “special.” What message does it send to tell my daughter that to eat “healthy food,” she needs to get her snack at the camp nurse every afternoon?

    How ironic that a summer camp that is supposed to promote self-esteem and inclusiveness can do neither because a child has the rare affliction of wanting to eat healthily.

    Yet in a country in which nearly one in three children is overweight or obese and in which French fries are considered a vegetable, it’s no wonder that the little girl who eats carrots and not cheese curls is “special.”

    When I asked the head of my daughter’s camp if any other parent complained, I expected that there would be several. After all, this is a wealthy suburb outside a cosmopolitan city with more Whole Foods than Food Lions. But the camp director told me that only one or two parents a year comment on the camp menu.

    We send our children to camp and trust that the counselors and lifeguards will keep them safe, from the pool to the buses used for field trips. Shouldn’t a camp also have an obligation to keep our children safe at the snack table? Singling out a child whose parents are trying to teach her to care for her body and eat real food makes my job, as her parent, much harder and doesn’t do much to support the efforts of other parents who may be trying and struggling to do the same. Given what we know about junk food, and its impact on our health, shouldn’t our summer camps — and schools — help normalize the eating of healthy food, not exclude a child from the group just because she prefers to snack on whole foods?

    And it’s not that children won’t eat these foods. In the work that we do at First Bites, we have seen preschoolers learn and love to make healthy smoothies, try new fruit, and — yes — even eat their broccoli.

    It’s that it’s the job of all of us — parents as well as schools, summer camps, and after-school programs — to set the example and offer the right choices to our kids. It may cost a little more than Chips Ahoy or be more of a hassle to cut a piece of fresh fruit, but it’s the price we will need to pay to tackle the real disease plaguing our kids, obesity.

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